New Here?
     
Posts tagged "Wenatchee the Hatchet"

Lady Susan Finesses Downward Mobility in Whit Stillman’s Love and Friendship

Lady Susan Finesses Downward Mobility in Whit Stillman’s Love and Friendship

Just in time for the DVD release of Love and Friendship, here’s a wonderful post about the film from our friend, Jeremiah Lawson.

The character Charlie Black made an observation disguised as a question in the 1990 film Metropolitan: why is it that the stories about social mobility Americans are drawn to only have upward trajectories? When’s the last time you saw somebody tell a story of downward mobility? Just to be clear, this downward mobility is not the Faustian rock and roll burn out but the fading away. Not that Charlie Black would have put it that way; he probably…

Read More > > >

Another Week Ends: Irrational Minds, Dangerous Parents, Anthony Weiner, Metallica References, Llama Drama, Post-Olympics Depression, and the Tastiest Fast Foods in America

Another Week Ends: Irrational Minds, Dangerous Parents, Anthony Weiner, Metallica References, Llama Drama, Post-Olympics Depression, and the Tastiest Fast Foods in America

1. This week The New York Times published an op-ed by Robert A. Burton entitled “A Life of Meaning (Reason Not Required)” which argues that most people would agree that (1) our lives ought to have a personal sense of “meaning” or “purpose” and (2) our lives should be “shaped by reason” or “rationality.” As concepts, however, reason and rationality get a little bit fuzzy when we consider the recent barrage of brain research evidencing the less-calculated “unfree” will of man. Burton explains:

“[T]he brain generates action-specific electrical activity nearly half a second before the subject consciously ‘decides’ to initiate action. Though interpretations…

Read More > > >

Toiling to Make Film Life from Comic Death: Batman v Superman Invokes and Bungles Two Canons

Toiling to Make Film Life from Comic Death: Batman v Superman Invokes and Bungles Two Canons

From our comic book expert, Wenatchee the Hatchet, here is a critical take on the recent blockbuster, Batman v Superman.

Prelude to Two Problems

As the “dawn” of the DC cinematic franchise, Batman v Superman falls apart at what I would call the level of mythos. This film had the dual task of continuing the story of Henry Cavill’s Superman from Man of Steel while introducing a new Batman. But the failure of the film is in its invocation of the images, iconography and concepts of two different canons: the Judeo-Christian canon, and the canon of DC comics. It might be expected that the…

Read More > > >

Love at Arm’s Length: The Dark Knight Can Do Anything but Give You His Heart

Love at Arm’s Length: The Dark Knight Can Do Anything but Give You His Heart

Wenatchee the Hatchet continues his series, “Justice Has Its Price: The Exiles and Orphans of the Justice League,” with this look at the character of Batman.

Over the years the Batman given to us by Kevin Conroy, Paul Dini and Bruce Timm has done a lot of things. Batman has foiled the Joker repeatedly. He has overcome worlds of illusion to stop the Mad Hatter. He has thwarted Ra’s al Ghul’s plans to kill most of humanity. He has outsmarted the Riddler. He’s done battle with Lex Luthor. He’s battled magicians. He’s even managed to dodge Darkseid’s Omega beams. It would seem there’s…

Read More > > >

Wonder Woman: Maid of Honor in a Dishonorable World

Wonder Woman: Maid of Honor in a Dishonorable World

This is the first in a multi-part study (“Justice Has Its Price: The Orphans and Exiles of the Justice League)” on the characters from the cartoon Justice League, brought to you by superhero guru, Wenatchee the Hatchet.

After the Caped Crusader and the Man of Steel have had at least half a dozen movies each, you would think we would have gotten a single live action Wonder Woman film within the 20th century, too, but we didn’t. One of the recurring debates among fans of Wonder Woman has been exactly why this hasn’t happened. Different explanations have been offered as to…

Read More > > >

Paths to Glory Light and Dark: Star Wars Recovers Its Pelagian Heart

Paths to Glory Light and Dark: Star Wars Recovers Its Pelagian Heart

This post is brought to you by the one and only Jeremiah Lawson aka Wenatchee the Hatchet.

It might be because I’ve been reading Mark Noll’s America’s God but in the 21st century it can seem that the ideal deity for Americans might just be the Force. With the arrival of Episode VII, The Force Awakens, it appears that Star Wars has the magic back. Yeah, it’s basically the stuff we’ve seen before, but it’s what we’ve wanted to see that we didn’t see in the prequels. Gone are the inept attempts at Greco-Roman tragedy for Anakin Skywalker. Gone are talk…

Read More > > >

Maid of Honor in a Dishonorable World: Problems with Wonder Woman in the Twenty-First Century

Maid of Honor in a Dishonorable World: Problems with Wonder Woman in the Twenty-First Century

Mockingbird Superhero guru Wenatchee the Hatchet returns with another installment of his Exiles and Orphans of the Justice League series, an rather in-depth installment on Wonder Woman beginning here, with a look at the problems she poses for 21st-century American narrative.

After the Caped Crusader and the Man of Steel have had at least half a dozen movies each, you would think we would have gotten a single live action Wonder Woman film, but we haven’t. One of the recurring debates among fans of Wonder Woman has been exactly why this hasn’t happened.  Different explanations have been offered as to why.  Maybe Wonder…

Read More > > >

Mockingbird at the Movies: Ambition and Delusion in The Wind Rises

Mockingbird at the Movies: Ambition and Delusion in The Wind Rises

This one comes from Miyazaki guru Wenatchee the Hatchet:

Hayao Miyazaki’s latest film is unlike anything he has written or directed before. Famous the world over for stories that delight young and old alike, his newest film has stirred up controversy. After decades of being used to Miyazaki giving us films for children, what do we make of his semi-fictional account of the aviation engineer Jiro Horikoshi?

While some discussion and debate about Miyazaki’s possible endorsement of Japanese imperialism or failure to properly denounce the atrocities of imperial Japan have already been circulating, these debates tend to fixate on the “what” of…

Read More > > >

Justice Has Its Price: The Exiles and Orphans of the Justice League, pt. 1

Justice Has Its Price: The Exiles and Orphans of the Justice League, pt. 1

This soon-to-be-classic series on the Justice League from Wenatchee the Hatchet looks at moral/religious themes from Superman, Wonder Woman, and the rest from the Cartoon Network series. In this installment, we look at the temptation of hopes and dreams through Superman’s character. For more on Supes, go here.

Saving the World from Better Worlds

Superman fights for truth, justice and the American way. Superman saves the world. He saves Earth from alien invaders who would destroy or subjugate it as well as from those who call it home and would refashion it in their own images. But as the animated series Justice League (Unlimited)…

Read More > > >

Batman: The Agony of Loss and The Madness of Desire, Pt 6C

Batman: The Agony of Loss and The Madness of Desire, Pt 6C

It is not without some sadness that we post this final installment in Jeremiah Lawson AKA Wenatchee the Hatchet’s epic Batman: The Agony of Loss and The Madness of Desire series. He has taken us so far beyond what any of us – even in our wildest dreams – could have imagined possible when it comes to Batman: The Animated Series, uncovering its remarkable philosophical depth, artistic daring and emotional umph, not to mention a set of psycho-spiritual parables that outshines almost all of its live-action competition. Seriously! If you’ve been reading this final chapter (on salvation), you know that…

Read More > > >

Another Week Ends: Dead Liberal Arts, Glorious Ruin, Cagematch: Hoffman-Phoenix, Victorians in Baltimore, Creative Anxiety, and Imputed Guilt (by Association)

Another Week Ends: Dead Liberal Arts, Glorious Ruin, Cagematch: Hoffman-Phoenix, Victorians in Baltimore, Creative Anxiety, and Imputed Guilt (by Association)

1. Over at The Daily Standard, writer and lecturer Joseph Epstein asks, “Who Killed the Liberal Arts?” With pre-professional education and a degree of liberal-arts relativizing on the rise, Epstein finds a central problem with American higher education to be the same kind of achievement cult that recent films like Waiting for “Superman” have criticized. Epstein’s phrasing is particularly succinct:

Trained almost from the cradle to smash the SATs and any other examination that stands in their way, the privileged among them may take examinations better, but it is doubtful if their learning and intellectual understanding are any greater. Usually propelled by…

Read More > > >

Batman: The Agony of Loss and the Madness of Desire, pt 6A – Apostasy and Salvation in Gotham

Batman: The Agony of Loss and the Madness of Desire, pt 6A – Apostasy and Salvation in Gotham

Believe it or not, this week marks 20 years since Batman: The Animated Series made its network debut. And we would be remiss not to mark the occasion by kicking off the final chapter of Jeremiah Lawson aka Wenatchee the Hatchet’s extraordinary look at the moral and philosophical (and aesthetic) mechanics of that landmark show. To go back the beginning, click here. Otherwise, buckle your utility belt:

PART SIX: CROSSING THRESHOLDS, or Stories of Apostasy and Salvation in Gotham City

Physics is aware of phenomena which occur only at threshold magnitudes, which do not exist at all until a certain threshold encoded…

Read More > > >