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Posts tagged "Sherry Turkle"

From the Archives: Not Much of a Technology Person?

From the Archives: Not Much of a Technology Person?

Been a while since we’ve talked about this, or heard from this guy. So here you are, a classic DZ technology rant. Throwback! 

We were heading in the same direction, an awkward number of steps apart, close enough that we might as well have been walking together. He was maybe ten years older than me, well put-together, kind face and a slightly outdoorsy demeanor. I think I’d seen him around the conference, family in tow, but we hadn’t spoken.

I was about to fall back and let him go ahead when he asked, “You heading to a session?” I was, I replied, the one on…

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Another Week Ends: Turklean Empathy, OK GO, The Cursed Child, Religious Skepticism, Couples Fooling Themselves, and Hail, Caesar!

Another Week Ends: Turklean Empathy, OK GO, The Cursed Child, Religious Skepticism, Couples Fooling Themselves, and Hail, Caesar!

Click here for the accompanying episode of The Mockingcast, featuring JR Rozko, Aaron Zimmerman and EKR.

The new OK GO video is amazing! Click on the image to watch.

Sherry Turkle, at it again, people. In The New York Review of Books, Jacob Weisberg samples a troop of tech-related books released this year, one of which is Sherry Turkle’s new one, Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age. Turkle, who we’ve talked about quite a bit on Mockingbird, is an MIT clinician and an ethnographer, and has focused her expertise in the last two books on the rise…

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Empathy Lessons for the App Generation

Empathy Lessons for the App Generation

This week, Sherry Turkle picked up where she left off in her NYT article a few years ago, “The Flight from Conversation.” This time, Turkle, who has a new book out, is talking about the lack of conversation skills in today’s young people, but more importantly, how their lack of face-to-face interaction has deeper consequences for learning the lessons of empathy.

It’s almost yawn-worthy to hear yet one more scare-piece about the waning of human attention, or the prospect of a monstrous grown-up millennial generation, but it continues to be on our radars. As we discuss in the upcoming Technology Issue, we simply do not have the…

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Vulnerability and Control in Online-Only Love Affairs

Vulnerability and Control in Online-Only Love Affairs

Writing about technology and social media is tricky. It’s incredibly easy to come of as a Luddite. When you describe the emotional and spiritual fallout catalyzed by particular devices or programs, no matter how many disclaimers you give, it’s almost impossible not to sound like you’re scapegoating the technology (Facebook or Twitter or smartphones, etc) for the problems of the human heart.

For example, you lay out the data about escalating levels of loneliness and anxiety and unhappiness correlated to increased social media usage and what people tend to hear–understandably!–is that they need to quit Facebook. Even if the person saying…

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Lessons Learned from a Summer Fling

Lessons Learned from a Summer Fling

This reflection comes from Chelsea Batten.

I probably shouldn’t have gone back to his place. But I was leaving the next morning, and I didn’t want to leave him a moment before. A proper Christian lady would say that she regretted staying the night at his place.

But I don’t regret that. What I do regret is that we turned on a movie. That we spent the evening watching it, before making out for a few brief minutes and then falling asleep on his couch.

He’d made me feel more special than anybody ever has, before or since. Every five minutes his manners,…

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Another Friday Sherry Turkle Ticker: Elderly Care and Nursing Robots

Another Friday Sherry Turkle Ticker: Elderly Care and Nursing Robots

Last time we gathered round for a Turkle Ticker we talked about the Second Life phenomenon, the use of technology to recreate identity or, at least, to use technology to impute to oneself whatever one feels one lacks. Whether it’s good looks, an interesting career, a different outlook on life, this is true not only of programs like Second Life but any social media apparatus that lends us the opportunity to present and posture something other than our very selves.

Today we look into the nature of love and caring. Is love a behavior, or an emotion, or an attitude? What…

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Another Friday Sherry Turkle Ticker: Second Life and Taking People at "Interface Value"

Another Friday Sherry Turkle Ticker: Second Life and Taking People at “Interface Value”

Second Life is an online community, a social network of sorts, revolving around created avatars, called “Residents,” who interact with one another–they live with, get jobs with, get married to other created “residents” on the program. The possibilities are endless and the identity markers are completely unhinged: a man can be a woman, a woman can be a child, a banker can be a dinosaur, a stay-at-home mom can be a powerful executive, or a fire chief. Fat can be skinny, old can be young, tired lives can be respun into a world of new and exciting ingenuity.

Of course, social…

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Rapid Responses and the Paradox of Time-Saving Technology: Have You "Untethered"?

Rapid Responses and the Paradox of Time-Saving Technology: Have You “Untethered”?

This from her technology manifesto, Alone Together, social psychologist Sherry Turkle points to our longing to simplify complex lives in an utterly counterproductive way–by “saving” time, we get into the game of time-saving, by nature a losing game because it is a game of measures. Turkle thinks this brings us to an impasse: we have developed attachments that armor the very vulnerabilities that need healing. In other words, we tether to untether. So, as you read this on-line, before your ‘off-line’ weekend, as you saw the worst in your Facebook feeds after last month’s election, can you relate?

We are overwhelmed…

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The iLife Pursuit and Adultescent Loneliness: A Conference Breakout

The iLife Pursuit and Adultescent Loneliness: A Conference Breakout

Bryan J’s recent post on The Law of Social Media (which could not have been a more apt primer on the subject) looks into a TED talk given by Sherry Turkle, an M.I.T. professor and author of Alone Together, who has become something of a clarion caller upon the state of our lonely lives as a result of the technologies we have become conditioned to need. Most of her research focuses on the loss of the art of relating due to the immediacy and detachments available with technology. She references, both in her TED talk and her interview with Colbert…

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The Wounded Soul of Social Media = Connected but Alone

The Wounded Soul of Social Media = Connected but Alone

This post may not break any new ground, but it does summarize about two years worth of Mockingbird analysis on the psychology and law of social networking. We’ve profiled Sherry Turkle’s work before, noting her front-line work on the psychological impact of social networking. We’ve profiled the internet-ubiquitous TED talks, and their exquisite use of social media to, among other things, tell us how bad social media can be for us. And yes, we’ve written extensively on the dynamics of Law and loneliness across just about every social network, from pixel-perfect profile pictures to the exchange of difficult relationships for avatar based…

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Technology, Honesty, Loneliness and Identity: Facebook Making Us Sad, Take 2

Technology, Honesty, Loneliness and Identity: Facebook Making Us Sad, Take 2

A follow-up to the recent post about Facebook making us sad is the full-length review in the NY Times of MIT professor Sherry Turkle’s new book Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. She’s basically exploring the psychological side effects of the Internet, which of course, have an enormous amount to do with identity, anxiety, control and what we call the Law. Although one does detect a slight air of curmudgeonliness (“in my day…”), and some of the insights may strike you as awfully self-evident, it nevertheless sounds like a worthwhile and important book:

Many…

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Another Week Ends: Facebook Blues, Freshman Blues, Bowling Blues, Val Kilmer and The Office

Another Week Ends: Facebook Blues, Freshman Blues, Bowling Blues, Val Kilmer and The Office

1. Libby Copeland at Slate asks the question “Is Facebook Making Us Sad?”, unpacking some findings from a recent study at Stanford. Very relevant stuff:

“The researchers found that their subjects consistently underestimated how dejected others were–and likely wound up feeling more dejected as a result. Jordan got the idea for the inquiry after observing his friends’ reactions to Facebook: He noticed that they seemed to feel particularly crummy about themselves after logging onto the site and scrolling through others’ attractive photos, accomplished bios, and chipper status updates. ‘They were convinced that everyone else was leading a perfect life,’ he told…

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