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Posts tagged "Sam Bush"

The Very Intersection of Love and Death: An Ash Wednesday Sermon

The Very Intersection of Love and Death: An Ash Wednesday Sermon

Grateful to share this Ash Wednesday sermon, by our friend Sam Bush:

Well, in a beautiful twist of irony, this is the first time since 1945 that Ash Wednesday and Valentine’s Day have coincided. It’s such a bad pairing for a hybrid holiday that it makes you wonder if someone screwed up. The ultimate day of fasting — the day we are reminded that we are sinners and that we are going to die — on the same day we give each other cute cards and chocolate? Thanks a lot, Ash Wednesday. Thanks for spoiling our Valentine’s Day party.

At first glance,…

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Hopelessly Devoted: Mark Chapter Eight Verse Thirty-One Through Chapter Nine Verse One

Hopelessly Devoted: Mark Chapter Eight Verse Thirty-One Through Chapter Nine Verse One

This morning’s devotion was written by Sam Bush.

Then he began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. He said all this quite openly. And Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. But turning and looking at his disciples, he rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are setting your mind not on divine things but on human things.” (Mark 8:31-9:1, NRSV)

I was in the store the other day and…

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(The Tide Decides) When The Hill and Wood Goes

(The Tide Decides) When The Hill and Wood Goes

If the cover of The Hill and Wood’s brilliant new record, When You Go, looks familiar, that’s because lead singer/songwriter Sam Bush and I share not only a long friendship but an affection for the work of Australian artist Jeremy Geddes. Sam somehow got permission for Geddes’s “Ascent”, part of his series of astronaut-slash-deepseadiver-floating-in-space paintings. No dove in this one, you’ll note. Instead, tentacles of fresh, slightly tangled plant-life are breaking through the voyager’s vacuum-sealed armor as he/she/it rises into the light. That’s no coincidence either.

The way Sam tells it, this record wasn’t supposed to happen. After a couple of…

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Bridging Church and Culture: A Conference Breakout Preview

Bridging Church and Culture: A Conference Breakout Preview

Seven years ago, Christ Episcopal Church in Charlottesville, VA renovated a small, single-car garage into a downtown art space and then guess what we named it? We named it The Garage. Since then we’ve hosted monthly art openings, potluck dinners, letter-writing days, some amateur film screenings and literally hundreds of concerts (five years ago, The Lumineers played in front of eight people on a rainy Sunday, long before they were writing songs for The Hunger Games, #neverforget). The space opens out onto a street and, during concerts, passers-by either gather at the entrance or in a park on the other…

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An Imaginative Festival of Lessons and Carols

An Imaginative Festival of Lessons and Carols

A yearly Christmas pleasure is King’s College at Cambridge’s famous Festival of Lessons and Carols on Christmas Eve, nine lessons and nine carols with a beautiful choir and traditional music. For those who just can’t wait, here’s a bit of the rationale of the King’s College service, followed by an Mbird-friendly, fresh and down-to-earth spinoff to tide you over:

The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols was first held on Christmas Eve 1918. It was planned by Eric Milner-White, who, at the age of thirty-four, had just been appointed Dean of King’s after experience as an army chaplain which had convinced him that…

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The Hill and Wood Lets a Good Thing Grow

With an icy breeze blowing through the East Coast, what say we warm up with a glimpse at the charming video for “Let a Good Thing Grow”, the main single off The Hill and Wood’s excellent, new Opener EP. Everyone is giving birth to something, indeed:

LET A GOOD THING GROW from Charlotte Hornsby on Vimeo.

The rest of the EP is just as breath-taking and exquisitely crafted, packed with beautiful harmonies and gorgeously unwinding melodies. Even after 100-plus listens, “Oil Spill” still gives goose bumps. And the second half of “The First Time” may be the most rapturous music these two have committed to tape (which is saying something).

Full disclosure: The Hill and Wood is led by the ueber-talented Sam Bush, a name you may have seen on here before. Fortunately for us, Sam has also just recorded a side project with bluegrass singer Kathryn Caine, A Very Love and Mercy Christmas. I know it’s too early to bust out the carols, but when you do, this is our pick of the season.

A Band Called Death: What Three Brothers From Detroit Can Teach Us about the Ultimate Trip

A Band Called Death: What Three Brothers From Detroit Can Teach Us about the Ultimate Trip

This comes courtesy of our consummate musician-journalist, Sam Bush.

When you think of “punk music” what exactly comes to mind? Skinny white kids in leather jackets?  Iconic album covers like The Ramones or London Calling?  Maybe you don’t have a clue as to what “punk music” is and maybe you don’t care.  I, personally, don’t know a thing about punk music except that it’s music for rebels and that that is cool.  But when I recently learned that one of the first visionaries of punk music was a band of three Christian black guys, all blood-brothers from Detroit, and that the name of their…

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Another Week Ends: Francis I and God as Love, Llewyn Davis Is a Failure, More Brene Brown, Questing Against the Wind, the Horror of Breakfast Meetings, Christmas Is Alright, and the Death of the Funeral

Another Week Ends: Francis I and God as Love, Llewyn Davis Is a Failure, More Brene Brown, Questing Against the Wind, the Horror of Breakfast Meetings, Christmas Is Alright, and the Death of the Funeral

1. Reflections on Pope Francis continue, with the increasingly-familiar tension between acclamation for the Pope’s compassionate, grace-focused tone and suspicion, from another camp, concerning his lack of doctrinal rigidity. Enter Rod Dreher, the prolific ex-Catholic writer, who published a while back in Time an essay saying the following:

I fear his merciful words will be received not as love but license. The “spirit of Pope Francis” will replace the “spirit of Vatican II” as the rationalization people will use to ignore the difficult teachings of the faith. If so, this Pope will turn out to be like his predecessor John XXIII: a dear man,…

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Faulkner as a Father: Do Great Novelists Make Bad Parents?

Faulkner as a Father: Do Great Novelists Make Bad Parents?

This reflection on literary fatherhood and the “blame game” comes to us from Mockingbird friend Sam Bush.

Legend has it that William Faulkner, in response to his 12-year old daughter’s pleading for him to give up drinking, sharply told the girl, “Nobody remembers Shakespeare’s children.” It’s a hard story to stomach, especially if your life has been eternally and wonderfully altered by The Sound and the Fury or Go Down, Moses. Faulkner’s books, of course, helped shape American literature and have touched the lives of millions of readers, but who’s to say that those millions of readers are more significant than little Jill Faulkner? The…

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The Paralysis of Analysis vs. the Gift of Bad Planning

The Paralysis of Analysis vs. the Gift of Bad Planning

This one comes to us from Sam Bush:

I cringe to think of how much time I’ve wasted making decisions. The hours I waste paralyzed in the cereal aisle easily match the time I spend eating cereal (and I always end up choosing Oatmeal Crisp anyways). Personally speaking, the ratio of time spent agonizing over a decision to time spent enjoying the outcome is roughly 7:1. The debilitating fear that leads us to second-guess is nothing new – just ask Hamlet or J. Alfred Prufrock – and, of course, little has changed about us as people. The “paralysis of analysis” is today’s hippest diagnosis among therapists due to…

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The Hill and Wood Is Driving Us Mad

The Hill and Wood Is Driving Us Mad

Full disclosure: If you’ve spent any time at a Mockingbird conference recently, you probably spied a bespectacled, semi-bearded man behind a guitar named Sam Bush. You may have even noticed how absurdly talented he is. Well, last month the man in question’s band The Hill and Wood released their long-gestating self-titled debut record, and ever since, it’s been serving as the soundtrack of the Mockingbird office. We even had to call in a sub to compile this month’s playlist; otherwise, it would have simply been a bunch of Hill and Wood tracks. The record is simply that good, and something…

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Monday Tidbits: Mr. Fox, The Hill and Wood, Kerouac on Brothers K

Monday Tidbits: Mr. Fox, The Hill and Wood, Kerouac on Brothers K

1. The first images of Wes Anderson’s The Fantastic Mr. Fox were released last week! The trailer comes out next week… Stay tuned.

2. The Hill And Wood. First Charlottesville, then the world… We love these guys. Check out their recent performance:

3. An index of Jack Kerouac’s colorful (and funny) one-liners about cities and states, very much worth your time, among them “this New York world of telephones and appointments”, “overcommunicating America” and “California TOO MANY COPS AND TOO MANY LAWS and general killjoy culture“. Then there’s this recent quote of his, unearthed by our favorite Kerouac scholar:

“The happy ending of…

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