Posts tagged "Pinterest"
They Shall Be Known by Their Pretty Food Photography

They Shall Be Known by Their Pretty Food Photography

Maybe it’s just my friends, but I think you might agree that your Facebook and Instagram feeds these days have begun showing less and less of the faces you “follow” and more and more of the, well, appetizing ventures they’ve been taken with. Mysterious travel vistas, jokes about slow drivers, late-night images of streetlights or sleeping pets or colorful anime kites–and then there’s the food. My goodness, the food. It seems that we are in the age of the homebred cookbooker. Nebulae of risotto are tagged, uploaded, copied, pinned, and repinned–at home, for dinner, comparable images are taken and posted…

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Another Week Ends: Philip K. Dick, Pinterest Slogans, Online Rudeness, Tiger Mothers, Bill Fay, Mumford Backlash, Louis CK, and Kramer Grace

Another Week Ends: Philip K. Dick, Pinterest Slogans, Online Rudeness, Tiger Mothers, Bill Fay, Mumford Backlash, Louis CK, and Kramer Grace

1. A breath-taking appreciation of late sci-fi author and savant Philip K. Dick that will make you want to go out and read all the man’s work immediately and/or join the colorfully named ranks of his fans (one guess). Dick’s Christianity even gets a mention, ht CR:

[Author] Jonathan Lethem notes how often, within their flawed and fallen worlds, Dick allowed his characters moments of humane grace. “There are a couple of his books that end with this uncanny expression of sudden, absurd, human connection of love — against the odds of which the entire book may seem to have been stacked.”…

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Longing Machines and the Pinteresting World of Online Curation

Longing Machines and the Pinteresting World of Online Curation

Here’s a meta one for you. In the most recent issue of The NY Times Magazine, the ever inspired Carina Chocano offered some wise and timely reflections on the “curation” phenomenon that occupies so many of our waking hours these days, esp in the form of websites like Pinterest and Tumblr. Chocano interprets the popularity of these sites as evidence of an addiction to (spiritual) longing–a desire to be understood via the objects (and people) we identify ourselves with. In her view, we are not after the objects/vistas/works of art themselves so much as the way those things make us…

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