Posts tagged "Nick Cave"

Nick Cave on Why Most Love Songs Are Hate Songs

Nick Cave on Why Most Love Songs Are Hate Songs

Dr. Cave, again, in vivid form, tells us about love. This time he delves into literary philosophy of Lorca, and the term “duende,” which means the power of spontaneity, the language of the heart, and also the Portuguese term “saudade,” which is a deep, rooted longing for something/someone that is absent. In thinking of rock’n’roll music, Nick Cave believes that a true love song is not true without this saudade. Any other “love song” without this longing, is not a love song, but a fraud, a “hate song.”

And then there’s his very carnal description of the Song of Songs. Take…

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Nick Cave on Why the Love Song Must Be Sad

Nick Cave on Why the Love Song Must Be Sad

I’m finally converted to Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. I don’t think it was this 1999 Vienna lecture that did it, though it certainly helped. It was The Boatman’s Call, which a friend lent me, that then opened the door to the man’s darkness, and allowed me then to enjoy Abbatoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus, which I had owned already but had not been able to handle. “Get Ready for Love” is the opening track to that two-disc record, and it preaches the Gospel, but in probably the scariest way you’ve ever heard. It is more or less bellowed. When…

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Another Week Ends: Reddit Confessionals, Influencing Nick Cave, Deciphering Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Gospel-Centrism, Reinhold Bieber, White People Problems, Bat-Staches and Haidt on Colbert

Another Week Ends: Reddit Confessionals, Influencing Nick Cave, Deciphering Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Gospel-Centrism, Reinhold Bieber, White People Problems, Bat-Staches and Haidt on Colbert

1. Last week I mentioned a recent study exploring the physical impact of keeping secrets, and by implication, the biological necessity of confession (to say nothing of absolution). This week, that study has become manifest in an alarming way. A Reddit thread which asked the question, “What Secret Could Ruin Your Life If It Came Out?” has turned into a stomach-churning tour of the darkest recesses of the human heart and experience, with people anonymously confessing to things as innocuous as petty theft and faking an illness (e.g. “I once helped out my a female friend’s family by taking care…

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Another Week Ends: The New York Mets, The New York Smokers, The New Wash-Ups, The Myth of the Man Pig, and the Voice and the Self

Another Week Ends: The New York Mets, The New York Smokers, The New Wash-Ups, The Myth of the Man Pig, and the Voice and the Self

1. A touching piece by dying atheist Christopher Hitchens in the recent Vanity Fair, writing quite confessionally on the loss of his own voice in his bout with terminal cancer. The way it is written, and through reference to a heart-piercing Leonard Cohen lyric, one can sense that this silencing is a deeper sort of loss of self, the “unspoken truth” that what he was by way of his voice, exposes a deeper presence of something in its very disappearance (ht AZ).

My chief consolation in this year of living dyingly has been the presence of friends. I can’t eat or…

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November Playlist

November Playlist

Pretty heavy on the classic rock this time. Happy belated Thanksgiving:

1. Heroes And Villains – The Beach Boys
2. Just Another Whistle Stop – The Band
3. Caribbean Wind – Bob Dylan
4. The Cross – Prince
5. Space Age Mom – Damien Jurado
6. Apple Of My Eye – Badfinger
7. Everytime I Itch I Wind Up Scratching You – Glen Campbell
8. Better Things – The Kinks
9. September Gurls – Big Star
10. Love Is The Law – The Seahorses
11. I Want Love – Elton John
12. Glorious Day – Embrace
13. Rue The Day – The Walkmen
14. God’s Comic – Elvis Costello
15. The Mercy Seat – Johnny…

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Nick Cave Introduces the Gospel of Mark

Nick Cave Introduces the Gospel of Mark

Almost ten years ago, Canongate Books published a series of single books from the Bible with prefaces from some unlikely people. Bono did the Psalms, Doris Lessing took Ecclesiastes, and Australian post-punk/goth singer-songwriter Nick Cave introduced Mark. I hadn’t gotten around to reading Cave’s piece until recently. For those with only a passing familiarity with Cave, a musician known primarily for the dark and violent content of his lyrics, the choice seemed odd. But anyone who had been listening closely knew that Cave’s music had long been soaked in Biblical language and ideas (his recent, critically acclaimed record Dig!!! Lazarus…

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