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Posts tagged "New York Times Magazine"

Thirteen Ways of Looking at an Equal Marriage

Thirteen Ways of Looking at an Equal Marriage

On Sunday, The New York Times Magazine published an article by Lori Gottleib about marriage equality. No, not that kind. This article had the search-engine-optimized headline: “Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?” Like many New York Times trend pieces, the article combines social science data with anecdotes from anonymous friend-sources to provoke its navel-gazing core demographic of 18- to 46-year-olds.

Well, consider me provoked.

The core premise of the article is this: In marriages where household duties are equally and gender-neutrally divided between the spouses, the spouses are less likely to have sex. That premise is drawn from a study…

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Start-Up, Stay-at-Home Visionary: Solace for the Perfect Mom

Start-Up, Stay-at-Home Visionary: Solace for the Perfect Mom

The New York Times Magazine’s cover piece for this past week is a rejoinder to one from 2003, about mothers “opting out” of ambitious, lucrative career fields, to become stay-at-home mothers. This time, ten years later, Judith Warner catches up with and spotlights three women in particular who want a way back into their careers, and the picture given is definitely (and mercifully) mixed. Of the three women, one is divorced and living in a condo, one is living her dream as the CEO of her own non-profit, and another just lost her new job, worrying how the kids will…

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A Generational Reckoning: My Kindergartner, the Technophile

A Generational Reckoning: My Kindergartner, the Technophile

Have you been taught, by a small child, how to play Angry Birds? Were you amazed–kind of creeped out?–to see how they maneuvered the slingshot, how deftly they manipulated those pig structures?

The New York Times Magazine just published this from fiction writer Steve Almond, about the perils latent in the swift currents of a technological upbringing. Unlike most articles of this type, Almond isn’t retrograde. In seeing his small children carry newfangled conveniences and distractions into their household, he doesn’t call forth his own childhood as the golden age, but as the age to blame. He calls his 20s his…

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Daniel Kahneman on Taking Credit and the Illusion of Control

Daniel Kahneman on Taking Credit and the Illusion of Control

From a very interesting, very comforting piece by Nobel Laureate economics and psychology professor/Mbird fave Daniel Kahneman entitled “The Surety of Fools/Don’t Blink! The Hazards of Confidence”; October 23rd issue of the NYTimes Sunday Magazine. His thesis, based on years of research, is that much (i.e. all) of what we attribute to good (or bad) decision making is actually the result of chance and/or forces way beyond our control. In his words, “educated guesses are not more accurate than blind guesses.” He tells the following anecdote to drive home his point, as well as to illustrate people’s discomfort with the…

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Pandora as Judgment-Free Zone

Pandora as Judgment-Free Zone

There is a very interesting article in this week’s New York Times Magazine about Pandora, the free internet music service that creates custom playlists based on your personal music preferences. I am a huge Pandora fan.

Most interesting, for Mockingbirds, is how the absence of judgment (i.e. law) in Pandora creates the space for love (of music) to flourish. Pandora’s entire system depends on a group of music experts evaluating songs in the most objective, least judgmental way possible, which often leads to unexpected musical connections for listeners, as is recounted in the following humorous anecdote:

Westergren (Pandora’s founder) likes to tell…

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Who Would Jesus Smack Down?

Who Would Jesus Smack Down?

This past Sunday, the New York Times Magazine ran an article by Molly Worthen about pastor Mark Driscoll and his Mars Hill church out in Seattle entitled “Who Would Jesus Smack Down?”. It’s a long feature, and raises a lot of interesting points, focusing mainly on the resurgence of Calvinism in America and the reaction to the so-called “feminization” of Christianity. I have to admit, I find the whole thing to be a pretty mixed bag. I’ve included some brief thoughts at the bottom of the post. See for yourself (my apologies for the super-lengthy post):

Mark Driscoll is American evangelicalism’s…

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