Posts tagged "New Testament"
Another Week Ends: Motivated Podcasts, Inverted Envy, Doofus Batman, Evensong Revelations, Rowling Rewards, Salinger Silence, Denny Lives Again, and Watterson’s Speech

Another Week Ends: Motivated Podcasts, Inverted Envy, Doofus Batman, Evensong Revelations, Rowling Rewards, Salinger Silence, Denny Lives Again, and Watterson’s Speech

1. “Want to Win a Political Debate? Try Making a Weaker Argument” reads a headline over at The Pacific Standard, and what follows is a helpful refresher on the overpowering role of self-image when it comes to argumentation. In very Haidt-esque fashion, and with the help of some fresh research, the article claims that the strongest arguments for a particular position are the ones most likely to trigger a defensive response from those who disagree. The implications for those engaged in any kind of religious or theological dialogue should be self-evident. As we all know, social psychology of this kind…

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PZ’s Podcast: A Heartache, A Shadow, A Lifetime

PZ’s Podcast: A Heartache, A Shadow, A Lifetime

EPISODE 149

Exactly 45 years ago, I began formal academic study of the New Testament. It began at Chapel Hill, transferred to Cambridge, Mass; continued in Nottingham; and concluded (tho’ not quite) at Tuebingen.

Looking back on it now, the whole thing was “A Heartache, A Shadow, A Lifetime” (Dave Mason). Tho’ I still have hope.

The hope lies in the inexhaustible life and wisdom of Jesus. That’s a well that seems to never run dry, or at least it hasn’t for me.

This podcast remembers a long line of impressive scholarly mentors, a longer line of students and teachers who were “working something…

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The Virtues and Vices of N.T. Wright’s After You Believe

The Virtues and Vices of N.T. Wright’s After You Believe

First, the book’s original title was Virtue Reborn, changed to After You Believe for marketing in the US. It’s difficult to understand this change, except perhaps that the American Church tends toward being sanctification-heavy, and purpose-driven, and the promise of a ‘Step 2’ to follow the ‘Step 1’ of belief must be attractive to us. A danger here is that the US marketing pressures almost presupposes a tendency of this audience to misinterpret as a how-to; this is to a degree how it’s being sold. But, with that out of the way, we’ll consider the book (hopefully) on its own…

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PZ’s Podcast: Christian Meanings of “My Sharona”

PZ’s Podcast: Christian Meanings of “My Sharona”

A little change-up, just in time for the weekend, we bring you the must-hear companion piece to this past Monday’s ‘cast, “My Sharona,” in which our hero, um, explains himself. Together they represent something of a summation, or, as PZ puts it, This is Grace in Practice for 2011.

EPISODE 55

The Four Theses I wrote for “My Sharona”, which is Episode 54 of PZ’s Podcast, express some convictions I have about reality. I expressed these convictions in a way that is somewhat new, or at least new for me.

Now I would like to take these convictions and express them in somewhat…

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Conference Preview: Gracious Apologetics: Building Bridges to the Human Heart Through Similar Interests

Conference Preview: Gracious Apologetics: Building Bridges to the Human Heart Through Similar Interests

I personally was really hoping that the 4th Annual Mockingbird Conference would finally be all about end time prophecy, and my break out session was going to be entitled “Are You Rapture Ready?” Alas, that is not the case so instead I will be leading a session on apologetics. I am a firm believer in the apologetic task; however this session will not be a fact seminar where one is given a bunch of proofs for Jesus’ resurrection, and the validity of the New Testament (although believe me the facts and the evidence exist).Instead this session on apologetics will…

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David Brooks Gets Inside Your Head

David Brooks Gets Inside Your Head

The final post in our neuroscience extravaganza should come as no surprise: David Brooks’ editorial in yesterday’s NY Times, “The New Humanism.” Building on the comments he made in last week’s interview with The Daily Beast, Brooks synthesizes some of the recent neuroscience findings in a characteristically digestible way, offering us another preview of his new book, which came out yesterday. Not much to add here, and less to subtract – I’ve reposted almost all of it – suffice it to say, you have to go out of your way not to be struck by how much Brooks’ insights jive…

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Another Week Ends: U-Bending Happiness, South Park Religion, Charlie Sheen, Louie CK, Friday Night Lights

Another Week Ends: U-Bending Happiness, South Park Religion, Charlie Sheen, Louie CK, Friday Night Lights

1. From one of the December issues of The Economist, some interesting findings about “Age and Happiness”. The main discovery being the “U-Bend” – i.e. the finding that people are happiest in their youth and old age, and least happy in between. The most relevant section for us has to do with “the death ambition” (ht VH):

Maybe people come to accept their strengths and weaknesses [as they grow older], give up hoping to become chief executive or have a picture shown in the Royal Academy, and learn to be satisfied as assistant branch manager, with their watercolour…

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The Humbling of Oscar Wilde, Part 3

The Humbling of Oscar Wilde, Part 3

The follow is the third of four posts highlighting the deeply Christian thought of Oscar Wilde while serving time in Reading Gaol. Having been given a Greek New Testament for reading, Wilde thinks about the suffering of his life and the person of Christ in a fresh way. The passage below reflects a version of the theology of the cross as applied to suffering and sin. Ultimately, Wilde sees God’s redemptive work through such suffering. It is a lengthy quote, but worth reading in its entirety. (See also Part 1 and Part 2.)

But it is when he [Jesus] deals with…

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“Wake me up inside…” (part 6): Karl Barth’s Doctrine of Reconciliation (iv.1.58) **final**

“Wake me up inside…” (part 6): Karl Barth’s Doctrine of Reconciliation (iv.1.58) **final**

(iv.1.58.4 cont.) In a final turn, Barth deals with the dependence of the individual on community and the community on individuals; of the Christian on the Church and the Church on the Christian. For, “there cannot be one without the other”. The Holy Spirit assembles and sustains the Church, Christianity, not as a heap of individuals functioning autonomously, but as a collective of confessing persons proclaiming the same truths each cognizant of their individual calls; this is the delicate tension between the “objective ascription” and the “subjective appropriation” of salvation. “Salvation is ascribed to the individual in…

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“Wake me up inside…” (part 5a): Karl Barth’s Doctrine of Reconciliation (iv.1.58)

“Wake me up inside…” (part 5a): Karl Barth’s Doctrine of Reconciliation (iv.1.58)

iv.1.58.4 Barth works out the threefold form of the Christological aspect of the doctrine of the reconciliation*. In and by Jesus, humanity is confronted with God. In Jesus, God—by becoming man—actively intervenes and takes up His cause—the covenant—“with and against and for man”. Jesus “is the authentic revealer of God as Himself God”. By Jesus one understands the Godhead because Jesus defines it and it does not define Jesus. “[Jesus] is God as he takes part in the event which constitutes the divine being” and He does this by becoming man. In this becoming…

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Luther didn’t start the fire: Peter Waldo (1170-1184)

Luther didn’t start the fire: Peter Waldo (1170-1184)

From here: Some men’s personal lives are eclipsed by the movements they start. Peter Waldo was such a man. He appears on the scene of history in 1170 in Lyons as a successful businessman who, touched to his core by a traveling minstrel’s religious ballad, gave away his money to live in poverty as a preacher of the Gospel. Having persuaded a sympathetic priest to translate large sections of the New Testament from Latin into the regional language, Provençal, Peter wandered through Lyons, bringing the message of Christ to anyone who would…

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Reformation Day Quiz: Punk Rock Edition

Reformation Day Quiz: Punk Rock Edition

Early Reformation Day Quiz: Can you name the man in this picture?

(Note the Stealth bomber bolo tie and unmistakable Halloween-themed Jack T. Chick tract)

Here at Mockingbird, we’re always looking for people, places, and cultural artifacts “out there” that reflect the historic truths of the Christian message (helpfully articulated by the Reformers we celebrate every October 31). One such artifact is this quote from the above-pictured former frontman of the super-important punk band, the Dead Kennedys, Jello Biafra:

“For every prohibition you create
you also create an underground.”

A major theme here at Mockingbird is the idea that human behavior does not respond…

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Leon Morris on The Atonement

Leon Morris on The Atonement

“We ought to be quite clear that no full and final theory of the atonement has yet been given and that this is not simply because we have not yet been fortunate enough to hit on the right solution. It is because we are not good enough as men and not profound enough as thinkers ever to get to the bottom of the subject. The problem is too big for us. Our minds cannot take in at once and the same time all the complexities involved.

“But the problem is not only a mental one. It is…

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Joel Osteen: Crazier Than We First Thought?

Proofs that can be derived from this video:

1) We always thought Joel Osteen interpreted the Bible wrong. Now we can rightly assume that he has simply never read it before (especially the New Testament).

2) If Joel Osteen is going to live under the law, at least he has the moxy to live under all of it, including the dietary laws.

3) If I could attain righteousness by switching to Turkey Bacon, I’m still not sure I could attain it.

4) Joel Osteen has moved up on all our lists from nuisance to Judaizer- an old Christian legalist heresy that said Gentiles…

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Fern Seed and Elephants

Fern Seed and Elephants

Fitz Allison suggested at the recent Mockingbird conference that we take a look at an essay by C.S. Lewis called “Fern Seed and Elephants.” It was in the context of Fitz talking about how to read the Bible — and how it makes a big difference, as it does when you are falling in love, with whether you approach the Bible (or beloved) with Trust… or with Suspicion.

Here are a few selected bits… click here to read the whole thing.

It is hard to persevere in a close study when you can work up no prima facie confidence in your teachers….

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