Posts tagged "Mindy Kaling"

The Mindy Project Hits Refresh on Christian Stereotypes

The Mindy Project Hits Refresh on Christian Stereotypes

This post comes from Mbird friend Chelsea Batten:

Summer is coming rapidly to an end. Cheer up: that means the beginning of fall sweeps! All the TV that I resolve not to watch, only to consume in a mass Hulu-powered binge during late nights in motel rooms in towns where I don’t know anybody, is soon to arrive in hour-long pilot installments. I’m laying away pints of Ben & Jerry’s in the freezer.

Chief among the shows in my queue is “The Mindy Project,” the Mindy Kaling vehicle that never lets me figure out if it’s bad on purpose, or ironically. Maybe…

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Over the Hill and Under the Law: Girls, Math and the “Prime” of Life

Over the Hill and Under the Law: Girls, Math and the “Prime” of Life

In The NY Times Magazine a couple of weeks ago, Carina Chocano launched another one of her missiles of insight, this time at the double standards about age for men and women in a column entitled “Girls Love Math. We Never Stop Doing It.” Her jumping off points being the pilot of Mindy Kaling’s new show, The Mindy Project (in which a 31-year old Mindy expresses more than a little angst about being ‘over the hill’, marriage-potential-wise), and a recent debate about the guidelines for runway models, i.e. that they must be at least 16 years old. But as worthy…

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Another Week Ends: Brooks on Empathy, more Quiet Beatle, American Commandments, Kaling on Chick Flicks, Meth to Master, Pre-Marital Hanky Panky, Psycho Congress, Tweedy & Ryan Adams

Another Week Ends: Brooks on Empathy, more Quiet Beatle, American Commandments, Kaling on Chick Flicks, Meth to Master, Pre-Marital Hanky Panky, Psycho Congress, Tweedy & Ryan Adams

1. David Brooks continues with his one-man campaign for a more realistic conception of human nature, and the implications it might have on ethical behavior, in his new column, “The Limits of Empathy.” This time he focuses on the question of motivation, exploring how easily/frequently something as ‘good’ as empathy is subordinated to self-interest (and laziness), ht TB:

People who are empathetic are more sensitive to the perspectives and sufferings of others. They are more likely to make compassionate moral judgments. The problem comes when we try to turn feeling into action. Empathy makes you more aware of other people’s suffering, but it’s not…

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