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Posts tagged "Josh Encinias"

Best Films of 2017 (So Far)

Best Films of 2017 (So Far)

A mid-year round-up from our friend, Josh Encinias:

We’re in the dog days of summer so it’s the perfect time to catch up on the year’s best movies. Surprisingly, some of the best so far were released this summer. Critics are clamouring to see Dunkirk receive Academy Award nominations and there’s no doubt that War of the Planet of the Apes, a quasi-Biblical epic, is worthy of CG awards. But it’s smaller moments in a movie that stick with you. Andy Serkis as ape leader Caesar is soulful—it can’t just be CGI that makes his character so relatable.

Smaller, character-driven films…

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Desmond Doss, the Coward

Desmond Doss, the Coward

This look at the critically acclaimed film, Hacksaw Ridge, comes to us from our friend Josh Encinias.

I loved being in the House of Dietrich Bonhoeffer in college, but if I were to create a Christian fraternity today, it would be under a different namesake: Desmond Doss. Prince is the most famous former Seventh-day Adventist, but Doss is the most important Adventist you’ve never heard of. I recently spoke to David Permut, producer of Hacksaw Ridge—who walked away with two Academy Awards last night—who said he wanted to turn Doss’ story into a feature film for sixteen years before it happened.

“When I…

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Lively Perspective from a Malodorous Corpse: Christian Liberty in Swiss Army Man

Lively Perspective from a Malodorous Corpse: Christian Liberty in Swiss Army Man

This one comes to us from contributor Josh Encinias:

Repellent as its non-stop farts, bone crackling, and other embarrassing bodily functions are, Swiss Army Man joins a new tradition of movies, beginning with Jean-Luc Godard’s film Goodbye to Language and Todd Solondz’s Wiener-Dog, that force the viewer to dig deep for empathy, accepting foibles of human will as humanity’s default mode. Otherwise, in these movies as in life, you will come away with a deeply cynical, solipsistic view of humanity. This movie may not be for everyone because of its purportedly divisive qualities, however, they are mostly joke fodder and background noise, masking the old story of death and…

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Sisyphus Says: Listen to John Davis (An Interview)

Sisyphus Says: Listen to John Davis (An Interview)

Many thanks to Josh Encinias for arranging, carrying out, and writing up this interview with one of our all time favorites, John Davis. 

John Davis doesn’t just shred on guitar.

Last Wednesday was Christmas morning for true believers. John Davis (The Lees of Memory, Superdrag) dropped demos for his scrapped third LP. While the 20 demos on Heart Medicine: Hypothetical Solo Jamz Vol. III: 2007-2013 aren’t a cohesive bunch — ranging from gospel tunes to hardcore — Davis didn’t pick these tracks from the musical scrap heap.

I was introduced to JD when he opened for the OC Supertones’s “final” show back in 2005…

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The Verge Takes a Swipe at Performancism

The Verge Takes a Swipe at Performancism

Here’s a quick one from Josh Encinias:

When the journalism market bottomed out in 2008, many writers—discouraged and broke—gave up on their careers. But a few years later click-bait journalism pumped life into the industry, and it’s still riding that wave. Measuring clicks may help with advertising, but a writer stuck on their deliverables become “traffic whores,” according to The Verge.

From “If Popular Books Had Clickbait Titles” on CollegeHumor.com

Last month, the American Journalism Review reported that The Verge’s editing team does not share clicks and traffic data with their writers.

“We used to show the writers and editors traffic, and told…

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Band on Verge of Self-Realization Instead Turns to God: A Few More Thoughts on Vampire Weekend's New Record

Band on Verge of Self-Realization Instead Turns to God: A Few More Thoughts on Vampire Weekend’s New Record

Very pleased to bring you the following contribution from Josh Encinias, the title being a play on this classic from The Onion.

There is much to be said of Vampire Weekend’s new album, Modern Vampires of the City. Carl Laamanen wrote an excellent review for the site, and I want to follow-up with thoughts on the album viewed through the interpretive lens of the character Huckleberry Finn.

Vampire Weekend’s lead singer Ezra Koenig and Huck are both known as curious explorers of culture. Ezra was born in New York City and grew up in a modest, middle-class New Jersey suburb. His lyrics,…

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