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Posts tagged "Jack Kerouac"

Memories from the Future: A Word on Abandoned Houses, Nostalgia, and the Hope of the World

Memories from the Future: A Word on Abandoned Houses, Nostalgia, and the Hope of the World

Grateful for this incredible piece by Nate Mills:

When I was 3 or 4 I had an apocalyptic vision. It may not have been as otherworldly as the Ancient of Days appearing in resplendent glory like in Daniel 7, but it was unmistakably surreal. My family was taking a road trip from our home in rural Canada across the 49th parallel when, as we crossed the Ambassador Bridge into Detroit, it appeared: Michigan Central Station, blazing in decrepit glory before my eyes. I was entranced.

Abandoned since 1989, the stunning 18-story neoclassical building appeared as a monolith presiding ominously over the Detroit…

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First Two Verses of “Pull My Daisy” by Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg

Jack-Kerouac-007PULL MY DAISY
TIP MY CUP
ALL MY DOORS ARE OPEN
CUT MY THOUGHTS FOR COCONUTS
ALL MY EGGS ARE BROKEN

HOP MY HEART SONG
HARP MY HEIGHT
SERAPHS HOLD ME STEADY
HIP MY ANGEL
HYPE MY LIGHT
LAY IT ON THE NEEDY

PZ's Podcast: Brandy Station, Pillar of Salt, Elevator, Peaches La Verne, Hero of the War

PZ’s Podcast: Brandy Station, Pillar of Salt, Elevator, Peaches La Verne, Hero of the War

Episode 133: Brandy Station

This one is about the creative process, the listening to God, as I would put it; and also about the Peace of God, to bring about the reconciling of opposites in the healing of the world.

I was thinking about “Peace Train” by Cat Stevens, which put me in touch with Looking Glass, “Brandy”, not to mention “Brandy’s” follow-up (It’s wonderful, as you will hear.); not to mention the memorable garment worn by the lead singer of Looking Glass and that comfort-food voice which calmed all fear.

Why is it the music for PZ’s podcast that’s almost the most…

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Gardner Taylor: Preaching to the Alienated Ones

Gardner Taylor: Preaching to the Alienated Ones

When I’m 94, I hope I’m half as wise and cut-to-the-bone honest as the Rev. Dr. Gardner Taylor, known as “the dean of American preaching.” In a 2011 interview on “Preaching When Parched,” Dr. Taylor was asked how one can preach and minister during the “arid” times in life. His answer comes across with the bracing honesty we at Mockingbird try to encourage, the gut-level truth-telling which was a focus of our recent too-hot-to-handle-too-cold-to-hold (Vanilla Ice) NYC conference. (He also echoes some of PZ’s past thoughts on Kerouac and the task of preaching). Listen up, preachers:

Q: How do you preach from aridity without betraying…

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PZ's Podcast, 84-89: Yvette Vickers, Protestant Episcopal SuperMarionation I&II, Bette Davis Eyes, Tana and Tahrir, and Pacific Overtures

PZ’s Podcast, 84-89: Yvette Vickers, Protestant Episcopal SuperMarionation I&II, Bette Davis Eyes, Tana and Tahrir, and Pacific Overtures

Thanks again for your patience with us this past week. As you’ll see, while the site slept, some of us were busy!

Episode 84: Yvette Vickers (f. 4.27.11)

Newspapers and blogs seem to settle for the categorical in reporting such events as the discovery, on April 27, 2011, of the body of Yvette Vickers in her house in Benedict Canyon.

Yvette Vickers’s death becomes a “bizarre” event, and gets linked to the Gothic, even, as it applies to the kinds of movies in which she appeared. (She gave knockout performances, by the way, in her two “legacy” films: Attack of the 50…

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Jack Kerouac and the Diamondcutter of Mercy

Jack Kerouac and the Diamondcutter of Mercy

In The Dharma Bums, Ray Smith (Jack Kerouac’s autobiographical character) describes his parting with his dear friend Japhy Ryder:

The next day I figured to give Japhy some kind of strange little going-away gift and didn’t have much money or any ideas particularly so I took a little piece of paper about as big as a thumbnail and carefully printed on it: MAY YOU USE THE DIAMONDCUTTER OF MERCY and when I said goodbye to him at the pier I handed it to him, and he read it, put it in his pocket, and said nothing.

Martin Luther said the Gospel was…

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PZ's Desert Island Discs (But This Time It's Books!)

PZ’s Desert Island Discs (But This Time It’s Books!)

I’m just now beginning to emerge from two years of living in the desert, the howling waste of inwardness that is caused by the box canyon of life.

I’m coming out of it.

In addition to the New Testament, ten books, in particular, have proven sustaining to me in the wilderness. If you read Mockingbird, many of them will be familiar to you. But I wanted to list them here, in one place, for the readers and supporters of Mockingbird, in hopes of their being useful to you. “For you the living, this Mash was meant, too.”

Each work, and three of them…

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Breaking The Fourth Wall: The Mockingbird Preaching Seminar

Breaking The Fourth Wall: The Mockingbird Preaching Seminar

A few priceless transcriptions from the second talk of the preaching seminar that Paul Zahl conducted at the Fall 2010 Mini-Conference in Pensacola, FL. The first talk had to do with the message itself, while this one, entitled “Breaking the Fourth Wall” (also the title of seminar as a whole), dealt mainly with the means and method of its communication. The full preaching seminar files are available on a pay-what-you-want/can basis on our Publications page.

I see the preacher as a channel for the uninterdicted compassion of Christ that connects with the listener who is in some kind of need. How…

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The Beats Having Their Tea (And Drinking It Too)?

The Beats Having Their Tea (And Drinking It Too)?

A pretty thought-provoking little essay by Lee Siegel in last week’s NY Times about the similarities between the Beat Generation and the Tea Party, which touches on insider-outsider dynamics, and the Christian religion’s inherent allure when it comes to “losers”. A few excerpts of which include (ht MS):

American dissent turns on a tradition of troublemaking, suspicion of elites and feelings of powerlessness, no matter where on the political spectrum dissent takes place.

The origin of the word “beat” has a connection to the Tea Partiers’ sense that they are being marginalized as the country is taken away from them. According…

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PZ's Podcast This Week: The British Invasion

PZ’s Podcast This Week: The British Invasion

Today two new talks have been published on “PZ’s Podcast” (Subscribe free on iTunes.)

The first is entitled The Browning Version and concerns a 1951 movie starring Michael Redgrave and written by Terence Rattigan, which is based on Rattigan’s 1948 play.

It is about a man who must lose his life in order to gain it. The material connects directly with the 25th Chorus of “Mexico City Blues”:

Is my own, is your own,
Is not Owned by Self-Owner
but found by Self-Loser —
Old Ancient Teaching

This podcast is dedicated to David Browder.

The second cast for this week is called “‘Man Gave Names…

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PZ's Podcast This Week: Preaching 101 (with Prof. Kerouac)

PZ’s Podcast This Week: Preaching 101 (with Prof. Kerouac)

We here at Mockingbird couldn’t be more excited about PZ’s Podcast, the new weekly offering from the Very Rev. Dr.theol. Paul Zahl. (Subscribe for free on iTunes by clicking here.) Paul has over 30 years experience as an ordained clergyman in parish ministry and even longer as an astute observer of the human predicament (and it’s only known Cure, which is what we Mbirds are all about.) That One Cure has always been Paul’s focus too, whether writing scads of books, teaching theology, or preaching sermons. Which, incidentally, is the subject of this week’s (Two Part!) Podcast.

For quite a while PZ has…

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Monday Afternoon Links: Faith & Works & She & Him (plus The Joan-Girl)

Monday Afternoon Links: Faith & Works & She & Him (plus The Joan-Girl)

1. Run don’t walk to Lutheran Theology and read our very own JDK‘s “A Brief Introduction To Faith And Works”. It’s a stunning accomplishment and a great “next step” for those of you interested in the theology which informs our perspective. Bravo! One stirring excerpt from the end:

“Only work done in the faith and security of God’s promised mercy towards us is a good work. Period. The seeming ambiguity of this position is profoundly unsettling, because it removes any ability we have to measure our “progress” in the Christian life, takes the ruler of introspection out…

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