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Posts tagged "Ireland"

Hopelessly Devoted: First Timothy Chapter Two Verses Five and Six

This morning’s devotion comes to us from the Rev. Jim Munroe. 

For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as the ransom for all, which is the testimony given at the proper time. (1 Timothy 2:5-6, ESV)

In 1492, there were two prominent families in Ireland, the Butlers and the Fitzgeralds. They were in the midst of a bitter feud.

James_Butler,_1st_Duke_of_Ormonde_by_William_WissingSir James Butler and his followers took refuge in the chapter house of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. They bolted themselves in, seeking protection from Gerald Fitzgerald and his men.

As the siege wore on, Fitzgerald had a change of heart. Here were two families, living in the same country, worshipping the same God, in the same church, trying to kill each other. So Fitzgerald called to Butler, inviting him to unbolt the door and come out. Butler, understandably wary of treachery, refused.

So Fitzgerald seized his spear, cut away a hole in the door large enough for his hand, and then thrust his entire arm through the hole. Fitzgerald’s arm, extending into the chapter house, was completely vulnerable, totally undefended, and utterly available for being chopped off.

James Butler grasped Gerald Fitzgerald’s hand with his own and then opened the door. The two men embraced, and the feud was ended. Thus was born the expression, “Chancing the arm.”

That door and that hole still exist today. You can go to St. Patrick’s Cathedral and see that evidence of chancing the arm.

But you don’t have to go to St. Patrick’s Cathedral to be encountered by the one who chanced his arm for you. For you, and whatever feuds you face with whatever enemies stand behind your door, that arm through the door is the arm of Jesus Christ. Chanced for you, his arm through the door bears on its hand the scar of a nail hole. It is offered to you, barricaded inside all of your own inner-chapter houses.

Van The Man Was Lifted Up Again

Van The Man Was Lifted Up Again

It’s not really accurate to say that Van Morrison went through a religious phase. That would imply that he had a non-religious phase. He was born into Northern Irish Protestant Anglicanism, had some childhood exposure to the Jehovah’s Witnesses, later on flirted with both Scientology and Rosicrucianism, explored Zen Buddhism, and nowadays simply describes himself as a Christian mystic (a la Kerouac). Accounting for the curiosity, he once explained, “I got interested in studying the religious thing because it was never shoved down my throat, whereas most of the people I grew up with or went …

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Bono on Healing, Reconciliation, and The Saville Report

Bono on Healing, Reconciliation, and The Saville Report

A moving editorial by Bono in yesterday’s NY Times about the remarkable events that took place in Ireland last week. I’m not sure ‘grace’ is the right word, but Cameron’s humility was certainly disarming, in the most important sense. From all appearances it was one of those all-too-rare moments of public life, an instance of genuine surrender and supplication that borders on repentance. And though I would be interested to hear from the Ulstermen themselves, Bono’s note of hard-won optimism strikes me as appropriate and even a little resurrection-like (ht SN):

“What happened should never ever have happened,” said the new…

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