Posts tagged "Fred Rogers"

Vade Mecum: The Garden of PZ’s Podcast

Vade Mecum: The Garden of PZ’s Podcast

In lieu of new blurbs for PZ’s Podcast (two new episodes went up last week!), we are privileged to bring you an appreciation of and introduction to this truly one-of-a-kind project, courtesy of Fred Rogers. We’ve tried to link to all the casts that are referenced – a few are not currently available.

Followers of Mockingbird will be acquainted, at least by title, with episodes in Paul Zahl’s podcast series. Perhaps you’ve had a listen or two; possibly you have become a subscriber through iTunes and make a habit of dialing them up. I hope so — if it’s too much…

Read More »

“It’s You I Like” by Fred M. Rogers

“It’s You I Like” by Fred M. Rogers

I was probably familiar with this song when I was a kid, but I recently ran across it again… for the first time. Its words of gratuitous unconditional love may seem a bit flaky at first, but if Mr. Rogers can’t pierce our cynicism, no one can! The lyrics are on par with that scene in Bridget Jones’ Diary when Mark Darcy tells Bridget Jones, “I like you very much. Just as you are.” (As opposed to who you think should be). Love that is not interested in attributes or works, but the person themselves, warts and all – we…

Read More »

Jim Henson on Puppetry, the Creative Process and Inner Children

Jim Henson on Puppetry, the Creative Process and Inner Children

The more you study Jim Henson, the more fascinating he becomes. He was not only a self-taught pop genius (the sort that I admittedly have an enormous soft spot for), spreading magic everywhere he went, he was also by all accounts a bit of a saint. A more irreverent/hippie Fred Rogers, if you will, with vision to spare, and the sort of connection to his inner child that some of us would kill for – the kind that gave him an enormous advantage in connecting with people of all ages. Of course, puppetry was only the tip of the iceberg;…

Read More »

In Praise of Mr. Rogers

In Praise of Mr. Rogers

A touching tribute to Fred Rogers in The Spectator of all places, perhaps all the more affecting because of its foreign origins. The author presents Rogers as something of a paragon of Christian virtue. A few of its discoveries were new to me, and frankly rather astounding. I’m talking about Mr. Rogers’ policies regarding advertising, correspondence and the way he signed his letters. Turns out the guy who many viewed as the archetypal wet noodle had more backbone in his pinky than most of us in our entire bodies. And what’s perhaps most impressive is how abundantly clear it is…

Read More »