Posts tagged "Doubt"
George R.R. Martin on Space Inquisitions and Relativism

George R.R. Martin on Space Inquisitions and Relativism

It’s true. The second I heard that acclaimed Ice and Fire author George R.R. Martin had penned this passage, my joy was inexpressible:

As a senior in the Knights Inquisitor, I command my own starship, which it pleases me to call the Truth of Christ. Before the craft was assigned to me, it was named the Saint Thomas, after the apostle, but I did not consider a saint notorious for doubting to be an appropriate patron for a ship enlisted in the fight against heresy…

Peter, the first Pope and ever his enemy, spread far and wide the tale of how Judas…

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Frederick Buechner on the Confusion of Faces

Frederick Buechner on the Confusion of Faces

A great section from Frederick Buechner’s The Hungering Dark, a book of meditations on the light that can be found in the darkness of doubt. Reminiscent of a staircase invention we’ve heard of before…

There is a silly little jingle that goes something like this:

My face I don’t mind it
For I am behind it,
It’s the people out front get the jar.

But, on the contrary, the person inside gets the jar too. You catch sight of your face in the mirror when you are brushing your teeth in the morning or combing your hair, and often…

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Legalistic Makeup and the Yawning Gap in Religious Experience

Legalistic Makeup and the Yawning Gap in Religious Experience

File this one under required reading. David Brooks’ column in The NY Times this week “Alone, Yet Not Alone” mines a very rich vein: the discrepancy between how religious faith is presented and how it is experienced in America (and the world) today, particularly in terms of the role doubt plays. The man appears to be on something of a hot streak, quoting Augustine and Heschel in equal measure, and dropping what could be a career-making (hopefully not -wrecking) endorsement of singer-songwriter Audrey Assad. The intro goes like this:

When secular or mostly secular people are asked by researchers to give…

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Bible Wednesdays: Jesus Walks on Water to Deliver the Cheetos

Bible Wednesdays: Jesus Walks on Water to Deliver the Cheetos

Continuing our brief series on some hot-spots in the Gospel by John.

In early parts of the book of John, miracles are generally followed up with some kind of teaching, a w0rd in which Jesus draws a line between the act and himself. This is the case with the Feeding of the Five Thousand, which is then followed up by Jesus telling the crowd the next day that he is the Bread from Heaven. Doing it this way, Jesus becomes more than a teacher and more than a miracle worker—Robert Farrar Capon calls them “acted parables.” Doing it this way, Jesus…

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Mockingbird at the Movies: Reflections on Life of Pi

Mockingbird at the Movies: Reflections on Life of Pi

“When every link is a separation, when we understand our communicating with God to be scratches on a wall, the complexity of life does not have to be evaded; we do not cease to wonder and wander, but merely are assured our wondering and wandering are not futile.”

-Matthew Sitman, on Christian Wiman

The Life of Pi struck me at first as a shallow film, with a couple of aphorisms about religion (a house with “room for doubt on every floor”), a movie that excelled in some areas – with four well-deserved Oscars – but something without as much depth as it tries…

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Another Week Ends: Miracle Baskets, Doubtful Essays, Optimism vs Quitting, Paternalism, Secret Menus, Netflix Puppetry, Bowie and Mats Return, and Hathaway Haters

Another Week Ends: Miracle Baskets, Doubtful Essays, Optimism vs Quitting, Paternalism, Secret Menus, Netflix Puppetry, Bowie and Mats Return, and Hathaway Haters

1. In need of a little (heart)warming on a cold winter’s day? Look no further than the spontaneous act of mercy that occurred on a high school basketball court in Texas last month, ht JD:

2. Phillip Lopate ponders the declining place of Doubt in an essay for The NY Times, evidence perhaps of deeper denials, ht SY:

Despite periodic warnings of the essay’s demise, the stuff does continue to be published; if anything, the essay has experienced a slight resurgence of late. I wonder if that may be because it is attuned to the current mood, speaks to the present moment….

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C.S. Lewis on Crucified Prayer

C.S. Lewis on Crucified Prayer

A lot of times, in moments of the experience of anxiety, prayer feels as far from us as the faith which feels so temporally impotent. Lewis deals with this in the context of Christ’s Gethsemane prayer, in his short piece on prayer, Letters to Malcolm.

Some people feel guilty about their anxieties and regard them as a defect of faith. I don’t agree at all. They are afflictions, not sins. Like all afflictions, they are, if we can so take them, our share in the Passion of Christ. For the beginning of the Passion–the first move, so to speak–is in…

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The Christ of Silence, Part One: Prayer and the Folded Arms of God

The Christ of Silence, Part One: Prayer and the Folded Arms of God

Here launches a three-part, week-long miniseries on Shusaku Endo’s eminent novel, Silence, about a Portuguese missionary in religiously repressed, 17th century Japan. The priest, Sebastian Rodrigues, in a paradoxically doubt-rife and no-less-gracious way finds his wayward trail to his own Calvary and, accordingly, into the very heart of God.

The sea only stretches out endlessly, melancholy and dark, while below the grey clouds there is not the shadow of an island. There is no change.

What does it mean when we pray to no avail? When we call on God and there is no change? What is this cruel silence? How can…

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