Posts tagged "Death"
Control Is Just an Illusion, But Love Casts Out Fear (in Disney’s Frozen)

Control Is Just an Illusion, But Love Casts Out Fear (in Disney’s Frozen)

This deeply personal, honest, and insightful reflection on Disney’s Frozen – and our love affair with control – comes from our friend Brandi Midkiff.

Lots of people sneer at the Control Freak archetype. I do not understand these people. They seem to think loss of control would be a good time—like a roller coaster, perhaps, which is actually a tightly controlled construct when functioning correctly and not killing people. Also people choose whether or not to get on the thing, thereby exercising control; so this is not the best illustration, though I see it used a lot.

Loss of control is not an…

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Brief Thoughts on the Great, Soon-to-Be-Late Poirot

Brief Thoughts on the Great, Soon-to-Be-Late Poirot

Next week, after nearly 25 years, ITV’s Agatha Christie-based Poirot draws to an end. Now just in case you start to think I’m more cultured than I actually am, I want to be clear that I have never watched a single episode of Poirot. It falls under the category of “shows my Dad tells me I should be watching that are usually British.” However, a recent article in the Telegraph has moved me to catch at least the end of this well-loved Agatha Christie series and perhaps to then start from the beginning.

On November 13th actor David Suchet will put the eccentric,…

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A Totally Biased Review of Robert Farrar Capon’s Between Noon and Three

A Totally Biased Review of Robert Farrar Capon’s Between Noon and Three

There are precious few books that elicit tears; even fewer books of theology. Walker Percy echoed T.S. Eliot’s “dissociation of sensibility” in saying that the modern person ”cannot think and feel at the same time.” Between Noon and Three: Romance, Law, and the Outrage of Grace, named for the period of darkness just before Christ’s death, comes as close as any contemporary book I’ve read to proving Percy wrong. Robert Farrar Capon, that masterful connoisseur of grace, weaves together thinking and feeling, storytelling and theology, in what he described as “a watershed experience… the most important piece of writing I have ever done.” At…

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The Dark Knight Dies and Rises: Sacrifice and Freedom in Gotham

The Dark Knight Dies and Rises: Sacrifice and Freedom in Gotham

[Spoiler Alert - those who haven't seen it, run don't walk...it's fantastic!]

“All their days are full of pain, and their work is a vexation; even at night their minds do not rest.”   -Ecclesiastes 2:23

“Put your sword back in its place, for all who take the sword will perish by the sword.”   -Matthew 26.52

Nolan has now traced the Dark Knight’s journey from streetfighter to hero, from hero to villain, and from villain to…recluse. Wayne has died to the world and only holds on to the shadow-life of mourning for Rachel, and Alfred drops more than a few hints that…

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von Balthasar on Buddhism; or, Zen and Jesus

von Balthasar on Buddhism; or, Zen and Jesus

A well-known 20th-century Catholic theologian on non-Christian religions:

Because through his faith and love Socrates – perfectly and to the point of folly – subordinated his existence to the daimon within him, he can be an intimation of Christ: he points to the divine by himself being a highway for the divine. The same could be said of Buddha or Lao Tzu. It is from their lived doctrine that Zen developed, the essence of which is to give practical training in how to transcend one’s own consciousness, how to make the finite spirit a vessel of the infinite Spirit – a flute…

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John Donne: Holy Sonnets (1)

John Donne: Holy Sonnets (1)

Thou hast made me, and shall thy work decay?
Repair me now, for now mine end doth haste;
I run to death, and death meets me as fast,
And all my pleasures are like yesterday.
I dare not move my dim eyes any way,
Despair behind, and death before doth cast
Such terror, and my feeble flesh doth waste
By sin in it, which it towards hell doth weigh.
Only thou art above, and when towards thee
By thy leave I can look, I rise again;
But our old subtle foe so tempteth me
That not one hour myself I can sustain.
Thy grace may wing me to prevent his art,
And thou…

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Will God Answer Hollywood’s Prayers?

Will God Answer Hollywood’s Prayers?

The following story appeared on a major news website yesterday:“Farrah Fawcett Shockingly Shaves Head, Hollywood Gathers to Pray for a Miracle. As Farrah Fawcett fights for her life, Tinseltown’s elite…gathered at the Beverly Hills Paley Center on Wednesday evening to reflect upon the starlet’s legendary life and hope for a miracle…”

It makes no difference who we are, whether Hollywood elite or small town suburbanite, suffering and the need for healing is universal, and we as Christians honestly believe that God still heals people today. The problem posed for most of us from a faith standpoint, though, is that God doesn’t…

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Remembering Flight 3407

Remembering Flight 3407

On Tuesday, the NTSB released the cockpit voice recorder transcript for Flight 3407, which crashed on February 12, 2009 killing 50 people. I suppose now the finger pointing can begin as to how such a horrible accident could have occurred, just four weeks to the day after flight 1549, the “Miracle on the Hudson”. The question, though, that such news inevitably brings up by reminding us of the pain we have felt in the wake of death and loss, is not how such things happen, or who is to blame, so much as how can we reconcile our belief in…

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He Was Dead…But He Got Better!

He Was Dead…But He Got Better!

I have been thinking about grace, the Christian life, and improvement in light of the movie poster for Crank, High Voltage. Despite all of the Oscar Buzz surrounding Jason Statham for his role as Chev Chelios-this statement is dripping with sarcasm-the tag line on the movie poster jumped out at me: “He was dead…but he got better.” This line resonates deep within me because for the longest time this was my impression of Christianity. That Christianity is about just finding Jesus for the purpose of making my life better. Unfortunately, everyday I make the theological error of believing that while…

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Pearl Jam Promoting Death and Resurrection?

Pearl Jam Promoting Death and Resurrection?

With Spring in full-bloom, I’ve had one of my favorite Pearl Jam songs “on repeat” in my mental playlist: “Thumbing My Way”. It’s a song of deep mourning and regret of lost love. Mr. Vedder is essentially describing a death, and he’s hoping for resurrection, for the springtime ahead…aren’t we all? Thankfully we don’t have to hitchhike to Heaven, although the imagery brings back some fond memories of Michael Landon, and there is some passivity implied. Still, Jesus is more like a special forces unit in a van with no windows going around grabbing people off the street. Just kidding!…I…

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Hannibal Lector on Why We Need To Be Killed Daily

 

“We feel murderous things in our lives, and anyone who denies it is a liar. We’re taught as children to repress all that stuff: Don’t be greedy, don’t be angry. We bury the feelings alive, and they never die. I think when you project on screen an arch-villain, whether it’s Heath Ledger’s Joker or Hannibal Lecter, it gets something to respond in us. It’s making us acknowledge that we have those parts of ourselves.”

- Anthony Hopkins in a recent Entertainment Weekly article.
See Sean’s Paulson post below.