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Posts tagged "Confession"

A Welcomed Interrogation

A Welcomed Interrogation

John le Carré knows spy craft. A master of espionage fiction, he also once served as an intelligence officer in Britain’s MI5. In a recent interview with Terry Gross of NPR’s “Fresh Air,” while promoting “A Legacy of Spies,” le Carré discussed the art of interrogation. He expressed his firm conviction that the “rough stuff” we hear about today (say, waterboarding and torture) is “quite useless,” not to mention immoral. Why? People under such pressure and pain will basically say anything to make the pain stop.

“I’ve found that trying to understand people, trying to befriend them, trying to indicate that…

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After Confession: From the Church, the Couch, and Civilized Life

After Confession: From the Church, the Couch, and Civilized Life

This post comes to us from Geoff Holsclaw, who was featured on the Mockingcast last week. Geoff is Affiliate Professor of Theology at Northern Seminary, and just published Transcending Subjects: Augustine, Hegel, and Theology. He is also co-host of his own podcast, Theology on Mission. 

From the confessional at church, to the therapists couch, and now in every public setting, we confess ourselves. It is the civilized thing to do.

Of course we bear our hearts without understanding them. We offer our souls without having grasped them. We confess our selves without really knowing them.

Truly I say, confession has become our new creed, and…

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Robert Capon on the Purpose of Confession

Some Lenten wisdom from the boss, via the Prodigal son chapter in Kingdom, Grace and Judgment:

“Confession has nothing to do with getting ourselves forgiven. Confession is not a transaction, not a negotiation in order to secure forgiveness; it is the after-the-last grasp of a corpse that finally can afford to admit it’s dead and accept resurrection. Forgiveness surrounds us, beats upon us all our lives; we confess only to wake ourselves up to what we already have… We are not forgiven, therefore, because we made ourselves forgivable or even because we had faith; we are forgiven solely because there is a Forgiver.”

RFC’s Between Noon and Three contains a pretty amazing zinger on the same subject: “Confession is not the first step on the road to recovery; it is the last step in the displaying of a corpse.”

Including That One: The Absolution of a Halitosis Hater

Including That One: The Absolution of a Halitosis Hater

A stop-you-in-your-tracks story of grace from the first chapter of Nadia Bolz-Weber’s new book, Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People, involving her dealings with a rather hapless newcomer to House of All Sinner and Saints. There are a lot of wonderful stories in the book, but this may be my favorite, for no other reason than the mundanity of the infraction. So true to life! Anyway, those who were at the NYC conference in April may recognize the episode. I read it at a class the other night and we all had ourselves a good cry. Posted with permission:

I never…

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Shining Some Light on True Detective, Season Two

Shining Some Light on True Detective, Season Two

This season of True Detective has – to say the least – not lived up to the high standards set by the gripping first season. Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey are hard acts to follow, so perhaps the expectations were too high. But the real Achilles heel of this season has been its plot, which was so convoluted that I had to consult a lengthy summary before watching the finale. As we all learned from the most recent season of a certain beloved comedy, TV shouldn’t be that hard to follow and I still can’t remember all of the main…

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The Place Beyond the Pines: Where Toxic Shame is Met with Apology

The Place Beyond the Pines: Where Toxic Shame is Met with Apology

SPOILERS…BEWARE!!

My wife and I watched The Place Beyond the Pines a few weeks ago, and we’ve been talking and thinking about it ever since. It’s certainly one of the “darker” films to come along in a while, and if you’ve seen Derek Cianfrance’s other film, Blue Valentine, you know what I mean. One of Cianfrance’s main concerns as a director is honesty, and in order to get there, he clearly believes one must show the “darkness as well as the light.” With its dynamic plot, strong cast, and brutally powerful themes, PBP is a strong case in point.

Ryan Gosling plays Luke Glanton, a motorcycle…

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Glennon Doyle Melton Drops Her Weapons and Steps Out of Her Armor

Glennon Doyle Melton Drops Her Weapons and Steps Out of Her Armor

With a criminal record and a history with drugs and alcoholism, Glennon Doyle Melton was having a hard time landing even a volunteering job. Despite her father’s suggestion that maybe “there [were] some things [she] should take to the grave,” Melton decided that she didn’t want to hide any part of her story, she wanted “to die used up and emptied out.” In her hilarious and beautifully honest book Carry On, Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed, Melton talks, among other things, about her decision to share her story—which, of course, really meant sharing her struggles—with others. With the same arresting…

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Another Week Ends: AKB48, More Super Bowl, Seeing Cézanne, Failed Rehab, Humanity According to 30 Rock, Presumption vs Grace, and Creepy Lance Armstrong

Another Week Ends: AKB48, More Super Bowl, Seeing Cézanne, Failed Rehab, Humanity According to 30 Rock, Presumption vs Grace, and Creepy Lance Armstrong

1. In the “mea culpa” world this past week, Minami Minegishi of the hit Japanese band AKB48 was publicly lambasted and forced to apologize on YouTube, where people have watched her tearful confession roughly 5 million times, for the crime of staying a night with her boyfriend. No one’s ever done a fantastic job with managing celebrity expectations, but this takes the cake, ht AOC:

“As a senior member of the group, it is my responsibility to be a role model for younger members,” she said, before ending the four-minute mea culpa with a deep, lingering bow.

The most striking thing about her apology,…

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The Duality of Lance Armstrong: Simul Jerk et Humanitarian

The Duality of Lance Armstrong: Simul Jerk et Humanitarian

I have been in mourning over the revelation of cyclist Lance Armstrong’s guilt for several months now since the preponderance of evidence seemed to point toward his having indeed doped (using banned performance enhancing substances) during his seven-year Tour de France reign. Of course, the man himself finally confirmed his guilt last week during a highly publicized two-part interview/confession with Oprah Winfrey. Now I find myself at a new place with the story since I am finally viewing Armstrong (and the many other cyclists allegedly guilty of doping) through a theological lens. In fact, I found Armstrong’s confession to be…

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