Posts tagged "CNN"
My Crystal Ball Looks Like a Mirror

My Crystal Ball Looks Like a Mirror

Over at CNN, they’ve compiled a list of predictions by various religious leaders of what will happen as 2011 enfolds. While each prediction seems to be made in good faith, the collection of them read side-by-side unwittingly reveals just how narcissistic each guess really is. Each leader believes the future will bring something good for themselves or their cause. A few examples:

Selena Fox, a minister of a Wiccan community, sees greater acceptance of Wicca:“More Wiccan ministers and other pagan leaders will be actively involved in interfaith organizations, conferences and initiatives in the United States and internationally. Interfaith endeavors will grow…

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The 20-Ton Shield of Perfection(ism)

The 20-Ton Shield of Perfection(ism)

From cnn.com, a smart look at the subject of perfectionism by Brene Brown entitled “Want To Be Happy? Stop Trying To Be Perfect”. Although the “solutions” section definitely veers into self-help land, her discussion of the mechanics of the Law is pretty spot-on/convicting. Speaking as someone who “struggles with” this issue, I find that most people talk about it as a pseudo-badge of honor, i.e. “You’ll have to forgive him – he’s a perfectionist”, “I know she’s hard on you, but she just has really high standards” etc. It would appear to be one of those unsanctified modes of thinking…

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Grace In Addiction: Extremes, Free Will and Sobriety

Grace In Addiction: Extremes, Free Will and Sobriety

One more excerpt from our recent publication Grace in Addiction: What The Church Can Learn from Alcoholics Anonymous. To order your copy, click here, or for more excerpts, click here.

Martin Luther’s biographer Roland Bainton once wrote in his classic volume Here I Stand:

Those who are predisposed to fall into despondency as well as to rise into the ecstasy may be able to view reality from an angle different from that of ordinary folk. Yet it is a true angle; and when the problem or the religious object has been once so viewed, others less sensitive will be able to…

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Nick Saban and the Doctrine of Imputation

Nick Saban and the Doctrine of Imputation

At a wedding shower for my wife and me, the hosts played a game where they asked us both the same questions about one another to test how well we knew each other going into marriage. With my wife out of the room, they asked me who my favorite superhero was. I quickly responded, “Nick Saban.” As the game went, my wife was brought into the room and asked the same questions about me. When asked who she thought my favorite superhero was, she immediately replied, “That’s easy. Nick Saban.”

It’s true: I’m pretty much obsessed with Nick Saban. On…

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Yet Another Wrinkle In The Avatar Story: Depression And Suicide

Yet Another Wrinkle In The Avatar Story: Depression And Suicide

Continuing the movie kick we’ve been on this past couple weeks, CNN recently posted this very revealing piece about the reaction to the film in some quarters (ht JAZ):

James Cameron’s completely immersive spectacle “Avatar” may have been a little too real for some fans who say they have experienced depression and suicidal thoughts after seeing the film because they long to enjoy the beauty of the alien world Pandora.

A user named Mike wrote on the fan Web site “Naviblue” that he contemplated suicide after seeing the movie. //

“Ever since I went to see ‘Avatar’ I have been…

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The Appeal of Susan Boyle

The Appeal of Susan Boyle

Within a week it seems that Susan Boyle has become a world-wide sensation. Last weekend I was over at a friend’s house when someone put on the youtube clip and all 15+ of us were mesmerized by her surprisingly angelic voice. She was featured last week on Mockingbird and nearly everyone who watched the video commented that they were touched, speechless, or tearful.

Now a week later, people are beginning to take a step back and wonder why there so much fuss over an unemployed woman from Scotland.

Andy Crouch, the editor of Christianity today said this: “It offers a picture of…

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‘Wise as a serpent & Innocent as a dove’ aka ‘What I Learned in Seminary’

Wise as a serpent
Pastor Eastwood

(Clint Eastwood in Pale Rider)
Innocent as a dove

(Billy Preston, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton & Bob Dylan jamming in a 1971 benefit for the starving in Bangladesh)

Anthropology and Politics

Anthropology and Politics

Being that we are only a few short weeks away from the Presidential election, I thought that I would share some of my observations on the build-up to November 4 and its theological implications.

Politics can be touchy, and I hope I don’t come off as preachy… BUT like The Wedding Singer, “I have the microphone so you will listen to EVERY #&@! WORD I HAVE TO SAY!”:)

It is impossible these days to tune into any news station – whether it be TV or radio, national or local, cable or network – without hearing something about “what happened today on the…

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Sinful Steak? Upton Sinclair in a Yarmulke

Sinful Steak? Upton Sinclair in a Yarmulke

In this recent op-ed in the NY Times, Rabbi Shmuel Herzfeld discusses the revelation that Agriprocessors, Inc., the largest kosher meatpacking plant in the US, engaged in illegal and abusive employment practices. Child labor, physical abuse, over-long shifts, and hiring illegal immigrants all allegedly took place.
Rabbi Herzfeld rightly calls for an immediate halt to such practices, and chastises some of his co-religionists who have taken a wait-and-see approach.

One thing in the article, however, struck me. Herzfeld argues that there is precedent in Jewish tradition to declare food un-kosher if the employees that prepared it were treated unfairly. It is hypocritical,…

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Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

From the NYTimes:

“Many Americans have come to believe, wrongly, that keeping an outsized chunk of the population locked up is essential for sustaining a historic crime drop since the 1990’s. In fact, the relationship between imprisonment and crime control is murky. Some portion of the decline is attributable to tough sentencing and release policies. But crime is also affected by things like economic trends and employment and drug-abuse rates.”

In a separate but related article, economist Lew Rockwell seems to be arguing that in fact imputation (people become what they are called) occurs in prison (the kind we don’t want) and…

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