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Posts tagged "Book of Common Prayer"

Is Resistance Futile? Initial Impression of the Pilot Episode of The Man in the High Castle

Is Resistance Futile? Initial Impression of the Pilot Episode of The Man in the High Castle

Probable spoilers below. We only have the pilot episode of the TV series available, and I’m giving away plot details of both the pilot and the book on which the series is based. The latter may/may not make their way into the TV show.

Promotional image via IMDB.com

The pilot episode for Amazon’s adaptation of The Man in the High Castle followed quickly by the excellent Audible.com audiobook of the Philip K. Dick source material have haunted me for a couple weeks now. I am particularly distressed by Amazon’s decision to add a resistance movement to Nazi-occupied America in this alternate…

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Rob Karlsson Will Not Make Your Life a Misery (Or Will He?)

Rob Karlsson Will Not Make Your Life a Misery (Or Will He?)

I have a love/hate relationship with The New Yorker. Each week, the magazine arrives. First: I admire it’s glossy cover. Then, the cartoons (“Hey, honey, look at this one. We’re not like that at all.”) Next: the always funny “Shouts and Murmurs.” Then a survey of the table of contents. Another food essay. Pass. (I will never eat there anyway.) In depth political journalism? Maaaaayyybee. The obligatory high-brow look at low-brow culture? Yes, please. (Recent examples: a super-aggressive female MMA fighter and a luchador in drag.)

But then there’s the fiction piece. And I’m torn. I know it will be good….

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O No, Captain! My Captain!: On the Suicide of Robin Williams

O No, Captain! My Captain!: On the Suicide of Robin Williams

In the film Dead Poets Society, Neil Perry, a young prep school boy, goes against his father’s wishes and performs in a school production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The father blames the boy’s teacher, John Keating (played by Robin Williams) for Neil’s disobedience, demanding Mr. Keating stay out of the boy’s life. In reaction to the situation, that evening Neil’s father takes him home, telling Neil he plans to enroll him in military school.

Later that night Neil, unable to handle the thoughts of his possible future, takes his own life.

Of course, today this plot holds a bitter irony since one of Robin…

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Reviewing The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography

Reviewing The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography

I was honored a few months ago to be asked to review Alan Jacobs’ new biography of The Book of Common Prayer for Modern Reformation magazine, one of my/our favorite periodicals. Seeing as the issue in which it appears just hit stands (May-June), here’s a generous portion of the article. Be sure to head over to Mod Ref and subscribe to read the whole thing:

To borrow a phrase from faux fashion icon Mugatu in Ben Stiller’s film Zoolander, liturgy is so hot right now. A minister at an evangelical Congregational church in Massachusetts uses The Book of Common Prayer at every…

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Another Week Ends: Anglican Anniversaries, Attractive Uncertainty, Battlestar Theology, The Cooler and Better You, Compulsive Tweeting, and Neurotic Parenting Art

Another Week Ends: Anglican Anniversaries, Attractive Uncertainty, Battlestar Theology, The Cooler and Better You, Compulsive Tweeting, and Neurotic Parenting Art

1. As the current edition of the Book of Common Prayer celebrates its 350th anniversary, James Wood at The New Yorker offers a fascinating reflection on the book’s literary and cultural significance. It’s not everyday you read the sentences in those pages like “The sinner is justified—redeemed from sin, made righteous—by faith alone in God, not by doing good works or by buying ecclesiastical favors”:

Cranmer had been a Cambridge scholar (he had held a lectureship in Biblical studies) and a diplomat, before being plucked by Henry VIII to be archbishop, and he almost certainly did not imagine that he was writing one…

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What the Heart Loves, the Will Chooses and the Mind Justifies: Ashley Null on Thomas Cranmer

What the Heart Loves, the Will Chooses and the Mind Justifies: Ashley Null on Thomas Cranmer

In 2001, in conjunction with the 450th anniversary of the second/canonical edition of The Book of Common Prayer, one of the world’s leading authorities on the English Reformation, Dr. Ashley Null, was interviewed about the life and theology of its author, Thomas Cranmer. Dr. Null coined what may be our favorite distillation of Protestant anthropology ever uttered, the one that rightly positions Cranmer (along with Christ, St Paul, Augustine, Luther, etc) as something of a social science prophet. Eat your, um, heart out, Jonathan Haidt!

“According to Cranmer’s anthropology, what the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies. The…

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Teetotaling on the Law? Not Hardly: The Bible, Binge Drinking, and You

Teetotaling on the Law? Not Hardly: The Bible, Binge Drinking, and You

Many people mistakenly think that we Mockingbirders have a low view of God’s Law. Some even call us (dramatic pause) antinomians. I know, I know. I’m as shocked as you are, but there it is. (In case you don’t know, antinomian is the fancy theological term for someone who thinks that Christians, because of God’s grace, can now go about the business of fulfilling all their little immoral whims. They are “anti” (against) God’s “nomos” (law).) The Apostle Paul, the guy who wrote half the New Testament, was accused of this (see how he responds to his critics in Romans…

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