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Posts tagged "Bill Wilson"


Now Available! Grace in Addiction: The Good News of Alcoholics Anonymous for Everybody

We are beyond excited to announce the release of our new publication, Grace in Addiction: The Good News of Alcoholics Anonymous for Everybody by John Z! Years in the making, this book is the most substantial–and dare I say practical–project that Mockingbird has ever done. The official blurb goes like this:

Church basements are curious places. Playing host to the vibrant world of Twelve Step Recovery, they witness the sort of healing and redemption that would make those on the ground floor proud, and maybe even envious. Yet despite the Church and Alcoholics Anonymous both being in the business of bringing “hope to the hopeless”, the two worlds seldom seem to interact. Packed with vivid illustrations, good humor, and practical wisdom, Grace in Addiction attempts to bridge this divide and carry the unexpected good news of AA out of the basement and into the pews–and beyond! Highly recommended for anyone who has struggled with addiction, knows someone who has struggled with addiction, or spent any time living and/or breathing.

*Not to be confused with the Grace in Addiction pamphlet that Mockingbird published in 2010. That one provided some of the basis and inspiration for this one, but it was 30 pages, as opposed to 285!

To read an excerpt of the introduction, go here. There are also some preview pages available on Amazon–where the book is available for purchase–though please note: Mbird receives quite a bit more revenue if you order directly from CreateSpace.

ORDER GRACE IN ADDICTION TODAY

Religious Prejudice and Alcoholic Resurrections

Religious Prejudice and Alcoholic Resurrections

A particularly memorable section of “Bill’s Story,” in which Bill Wilson, primary author of The Big Book and co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, recounts what it was like to begin thinking about religious ideas afresh, in light of the significant internal resistance/baggage incurred by negative experiences he’d had with the church as a youth. The occasion of his reflection is a visit from an old drinking buddy who had appeared on Bill’s doorstep, sober and having “gotten religion.” From pages 9-12 of The Big Book:

He had come to pass his experience along to me – if I cared to have it….

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THE MOCKINGBIRD SINGS: Pensacola & Good News for People with Big Problems, Plus

THE MOCKINGBIRD SINGS: Pensacola & Good News for People with Big Problems, Plus

1. The Pensacola Mini-Conference is a mere 11 days away! November 19th and 20th are your long-awaited chances to experience Mockingbird in all its physical, um, glory. The theme is “God’s Grace When We Need It Most: The Gospel For Hard Times,” and we promise it will be more fun than it sounds (you can read the previews of the content here), especially with the Mockingfather himself, Dr. Paul Zahl, speaking! Believe it or not, what we’re most looking forward to is PZ’s pre-conference seminar on preaching/ministry/life – not that any of us need help with our sermons, of course…!

Register…

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The Original Manuscript of AA's Big Book

The Original Manuscript of AA’s Big Book

From yesterday’s Washington Post, an article about the publication of the original, annotated Big Book entitled “AA Original Manuscript Reveals Profound Debate Over Religion.” We couldn’t have asked for a better advertisement for our recent publication Grace in Addiction: What The Church Can Learn From Alcoholics Anonymous, which picks up the topic and runs with it! (Speaking of Grace in Addiction, it’s available for 25% off until Sept 30th). A few excerpts from the article – avoid the metafiler comments if you know what’s good for you:

After being hidden away for nearly 70 years and then auctioned twice, the original…

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Bill Wilson, AA, and the Gospel of Disempowerment

Bill Wilson, AA, and the Gospel of Disempowerment

The NY Times recently published an absolute knockout of an editorial by David Brooks, entitled “Bill Wilson’s Gospel”  wherein some of the counter-intuitive virtues of Alcoholics Anonymous are extolled. A few choice paragraphs include (ht MZ):

In a culture that generally celebrates empowerment and self-esteem, A.A. begins with disempowerment. The goal is to get people to gain control over their lives, but it all begins with an act of surrender and an admission of weakness.

In a culture that thinks of itself as individualistic, A.A. relies on fellowship. The general idea is that people aren’t really captains of their own ship. Successful…

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