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Posts tagged "Beyond Deserving"

Dorothy Martyn Explains What She Means By "Beyond Deserving"

Dorothy Martyn Explains What She Means By “Beyond Deserving

Taken from the introduction to Dr. Martyn’s now classic child psychology text–a must-read for Mockingbirds everywhere (especially those with children)–Beyond Deserving: Children, Parents, and Responsibility Revisited, here’s a quick word from one of our esteemed 2009 Conference speakers, emphasis hers:

This phrase, “beyond deserving,” may be a bit puzzling at first glance. After all, the idea of “deserving” permeates our language and is taken for granted in much of our daily life, from grades at school to rewards for exceptional performance – such as whether one “deserved” a gold medal or the Nobel Prize – to our ideas of criminal justice….

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Dorothy Martyn on Timothy McVeigh and Responsible Irresponsibility

Dorothy Martyn on Timothy McVeigh and Responsible Irresponsibility

From Dorothy Martyn’s masterful treatise on child psychology Beyond Deserving. A few of these lines have appeared on here before, but the longer quote is terrific, especially in conjunction with the Milosz poem below. From pages 155-156:

’I am the master of my fate, the captain of my soul’ has remained for some who learned the lines in high school a stirring and inspirational thought. It was quoted by Timothy McVeigh, the condemned Oklahoma terrorist, just before his execution. What utter illusion in this person clearly enslaved to the invisible forces working within him! His belief that he had been in…

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Good News for Misbehaving Children (and Their Parents, Too): Dorothy Martyn's Beyond Deserving

Good News for Misbehaving Children (and Their Parents, Too): Dorothy Martyn’s Beyond Deserving

A fixture on the Mockingbird Reading List is Beyond Deserving: Children, Parents, and Responsibility Revisited by Dorothy Martyn. Dr. Martyn is a child psychologist, a committed Freudian, and yes, a Christian of the most grace-centered kind. Don’t be put off by the slightly academic cover and title–the real thrust of the book is theological and literary. She uses fascinating case studies (and a whole lot of Emily Dickinson) to illustrate how unconditional love and grace play out in the lives of difficult children.

As is always the case when we touch on the intersection of grace and parenting, the temptation will…

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