Posts tagged "Anglo Catholicism"

PZ’s Podcast: P.E. II

PZ’s Podcast: P.E. II

EPISODE 26

High-Church Christianity is an interesting phenomenon. You have the ultimate High Church: the Church of Rome. But then you have High-Church Lutherans, High-Church Anglicans, even High-Church Methodists and High-Church Baptists. Yes, really. It all starts to get relative, though the gold standard will always be the Roman Catholic Church. (There are Low-Church Roman Catholics, interestingly enough.)

This is the second and final podcast concerning the portrait of Episcopalianism as found in the novels of James Gould Cozzens (for the write-up of the first, go here). First, there is an Episcopal funeral as remembered by a thirteen-year-old boy whose mother…

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Deep Notes Of A Blast From The Past: James Gould Cozzens’ Men And Brethren

Deep Notes Of A Blast From The Past: James Gould Cozzens’ Men And Brethren

The reason that the neglected American novelist James Gould Cozzens (1903-1978) finds a resonance with Mockingbird has to do with his observations on human nature — he believed in Original Sin — and with his unforgettable, discomfiting descriptions of reality, things as they are, De rerum natura.

Moreover, Cozzens had an archaeological personal link with the Episcopal Church: its outward life, its inward life, its rectors and its wardens, its original constituency and its continuing adaptations, its historic strengths and repeating weaknesses. Cozzens was “P.E.” (“Protestant Episcopal”, which is old lingo for Low Church but not necessarily Evangelical)…

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All The Romery People

All The Romery People

In Oxford on October 15, 1555, Anglican Bishops Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley were burned as Protestant heretics under the reign of Queen Mary. Shortly before they were murdered, Ridley said to Latimer, “Play the man, Master Ridley; we shall this day light such a candle, by God’s grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.” And although this candle has indeed burned for over 450 years, many believe that this week’s Papal decision to allow for disaffected Anglicans to enter full communion with the Roman church, may reduce it to, at best, a smoldering wick.

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