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Posts tagged "Anglicanism"

Hope, Realism, and the Protestant Face of Anglicanism

Hope, Realism, and the Protestant Face of Anglicanism

Back in 1998, my father wrote an unfashionable yet characteristically compelling little volume entitled The Protestant Face of Anglicanism. With the big anniversary finally here, it seemed like an ideal time to remind people of its existence (and merit)! Coincidentally, the book shares the title of PZ’s latest project, a tumblr devoted to, well, you guessed it. He’s provided us with a personal introduction to the project below, but first, a couple of zinging paragraphs from the final chapter of the book in question:

The Reformers saw the message of justification as a word of comfort, first and primarily, to the troubled conscience. The conscience, unable…

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Reviewing The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography

Reviewing The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography

I was honored a few months ago to be asked to review Alan Jacobs’ new biography of The Book of Common Prayer for Modern Reformation magazine, one of my/our favorite periodicals. Seeing as the issue in which it appears just hit stands (May-June), here’s a generous portion of the article. Be sure to head over to Mod Ref and subscribe to read the whole thing:

To borrow a phrase from faux fashion icon Mugatu in Ben Stiller’s film Zoolander, liturgy is so hot right now. A minister at an evangelical Congregational church in Massachusetts uses The Book of Common Prayer at every…

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The Road (to Canterbury) Goes on Forever: Gregg Allman the Unlikely Episcopalian

The Road (to Canterbury) Goes on Forever: Gregg Allman the Unlikely Episcopalian

I just finished reading Gregg Allman’s really-pretty-good new memoir, My Cross to Bear, and the final chapter contains a revelation too unexpected not to share here. Which isn’t to say the first eighteen chapters aren’t full of remarkable twists and turns as well. There are more than enough anecdotes to support the Almost Famous-Allman Brothers connection, and let’s just say that Gregg’s legendary proclivity for female, er, attention does not go undocumented. Nor does his distaste for one Mr. Richard Betts. But as much as debauchery and dysfunction serve as touchstones, so do sorrow and tragedy–which you might expect from…

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PZ's Podcast: Requiem, Bishop Ryle, and J.C. Ryle Considered

PZ’s Podcast: Requiem, Bishop Ryle, and J.C. Ryle Considered

Episode 106: Requiem

The alternate title for this cast is: “I Feel Like I Lose When I Win” (ABBA Bizarro).

Happiness is no dice for the ego, our “person” we think is us, always looking back over their shoulder. And not just at all the attacks that are coming, by definition; but especially at Death. Happiness can be no dice for the ego. (Say it isn’t so.)

Let’s “Have His Carcase” (Dorothy L. Sayers) then, and have done with it!

It happened to Elspeth Schragmueller, also known as “Fraulein Doktor”. Or at least it happened to her in the movies. It’s an excellent learning,…

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Even As Though There Were No Law: William Tyndale on the Christian Life

Even As Though There Were No Law: William Tyndale on the Christian Life

Was William Tyndale, a founding father of Anglicanism, an antinomian? The following comes from his Prologue to the book of Romans. In it he outlines a Christian life which is unflinchingly active in works, yet it does so wholly apart from the law. In the economy of the Christian life, the true purpose of the law is to become obsolete. For my money, it’s the closest thing I find to capturing what Paul meant when he said we are “not under law but under grace” (Rom. 6:15) The whole thing is worth a read, if you have the time. Please…

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Look How They Shine For You: Coming to Terms with Coldplay

Look How They Shine For You: Coming to Terms with Coldplay

I’ll never forget the day back in 1999, when the snobbiest record store clerk I’ve ever known, the guy who introduced me to both Scott Walker and The Left Banke, wouldn’t let me leave his shop until I heard “the best British single of the decade.” The song was “Yellow” and the band was the then-unknown Coldplay. When their first album finally came out in the States, I remember thinking that nothing else approached the power of that song, that they were probably just another flash in the pan, albeit a pleasant one.

Here we are twelve years later and Coldplay…

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PZ's Podcast: The Yardbirds (For Your Love)

PZ’s Podcast: The Yardbirds (For Your Love)

EPISODE 37

This is about The Yardbirds, the British Invasion avant-garde band that brought us hope, instinct, and, finally, a Stairway to Heaven. The band, which existed from 1963 to 1968, was our first exposure toEric Clapton, then Jeff Beck, and then Jimmy Page — all guitar gods, but Page had worked with Joe Meek, so he really was touched with deity.

My talk gives the basic facts about The Yardbirds, scores their searing songs, such as “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl”, “I Ain’t Got You”, “Heart Full of Soul”, “You’re a Better Man than I”, “Shapes ofThings”, “Evil Hearted You”, “I’m a Man”,…

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PZ's Podcast: "Mr." Priest and The King's Speech (Cosmo Lang)

PZ’s Podcast: "Mr." Priest and The King’s Speech (Cosmo Lang)

EPISODES 33&34

You can usually tell when things aren’t going well for an institution, when professional titles become inflated. Great academics in this country used often to be called by the title ‘Mr.’ rather than ‘Professor’ or ‘Doctor’. Or take the United States Navy. Then, too, in the Episcopal Church and the Church of England, ministers were always called ‘Mr.’. That is, until recently. As with other things, no one believes you when you point this out. It is simply inconceivable to the great majority of church folk that the rector of their parish should have been known as…

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PZ's Podcast: Protestant Interiors (Whistling Dixie)

PZ’s Podcast: Protestant Interiors (Whistling Dixie)

EPISODES 31&32

You can say all you want about a certain thing, yet people won’t believe you. They will simply not believe you. You can present old documents and ancient photographs, accompanied by diaries and essays by people who were “there”; and they still won’t believe you. For whatever reasons of their own, they won’t believe you.

That’s the experience I have had for almost 40 years in trying to convince people that Anglican Christianity is a Protestant phenomenon, or at least was once Protestant.

The fact that this is an empirical fact, which can be proven from the evidence and…

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What the Heart Loves, the Will Chooses and the Mind Justifies: Ashley Null on Thomas Cranmer

What the Heart Loves, the Will Chooses and the Mind Justifies: Ashley Null on Thomas Cranmer

In 2001, in conjunction with the 450th anniversary of the second/canonical edition of The Book of Common Prayer, one of the world’s leading authorities on the English Reformation, Dr. Ashley Null, was interviewed about the life and theology of its author, Thomas Cranmer. Dr. Null coined what may be our favorite distillation of Protestant anthropology ever uttered, the one that rightly positions Cranmer (along with Christ, St Paul, Augustine, Luther, etc) as something of a social science prophet. Eat your, um, heart out, Jonathan Haidt!

“According to Cranmer’s anthropology, what the heart loves, the will chooses, and the mind justifies. The…

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Mere Anglicanism 2011

Mere Anglicanism 2011

The 2011 Mere Anglicanism conference this year is held in thanksgiving for the faithful witness of Bishop C. FitzSimons Allison to the Word of God’s Grace. It will be held at St. Philip’s Church in Charleston S.C. January 20-23. Some of Mockingbird’s favorite theologians will be speaking at the conference.

Here is the Morning Prayer Homilist for the conferenceDr. Jim Nestingen

“At the same time , the First Commandment sums up the whole gospel. It is God’s promise, the announcement of the decision that God has made for you and each of us in Christ. This is the promise Paul declares…

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Mere Anglicanism 2011

Mere Anglicanism 2011

The 2011 Mere Anglicanism conference this year is held in thanksgiving for the faithful witness of Bishop C. FitzSimons Allison to the Word of God’s Grace. It will be held at St. Phillips Church in Charleston S.C. January 20-23. Some of Mockingbird’s favorite theologians will be speaking at the conference.

This is one of my favorite quotes from Bishop Allison:

“A sergeant told a grim joke to his trainees during the Second World War, which shows the real flaw in the Pharisaic understanding of Christianity. A man stopped on a dirt road to help get another man’s car our…

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