Posts tagged "Aaron Sorkin"

Sanctimonious? Think Again – The Fall in The Newsroom, Season 2

Sanctimonious? Think Again – The Fall in The Newsroom, Season 2

[Spoiler Alert! – Latest Episode] The second Will McAvoy admits fault, he’s started on a path toward redemption – and Aaron Sorkin’s The Newsroom along with him, in perhaps its best episode so far. We postmoderns are on a long, brutal hangover from idealism – especially its horrific twentieth-century manifestations – and, like a last-night drunk being offered a gin and tonic, we’re extremely allergic to anything that reminds us of our tendency toward theologies of glory. Cue the voyeuristic obsession with depravity on TV that’s characterized its “Golden Age”, as well as the scathing reviews Newsroom’s Season 1 received….

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To the Dark Side of The Newsroom: Thoughts on Season Two

To the Dark Side of The Newsroom: Thoughts on Season Two

The best criticism of Aaron Sorkin’s first season of his Utopian TV news series was that it was too sanctimonious. It was too sanctimonious, but Season 2 is looking to turn things around on that front – spoiler alert.

Season 1 was a thrill for anyone with an idealistic bent: Sorkin invited us to imagine a news network that would resist such banal tragedy indulgence as covering the Casey Anthony trial, that would be a public advocate in bringing the most important issues to light and cut through Washington’s often-facile appeals and convoluted rhetoric. It would invite us, its happy viewers…

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Another Week Ends: Spoiled Kids, Harvard Perfectionism, KKKlan Grace, Lonergan’s Lament, Negative Thinking, Mormonism, Golf Ethics, Sorkinisms, and Fall Conference Update

Another Week Ends: Spoiled Kids, Harvard Perfectionism, KKKlan Grace, Lonergan’s Lament, Negative Thinking, Mormonism, Golf Ethics, Sorkinisms, and Fall Conference Update

1. Over at The New Yorker, Elizabeth Kolbert surveyed the latest swath of parenting books, asking the question “Why Are American Kids So Spoiled?” Much of the article reiterates what we’ve been hearing with alarming frequency the past couple years, namely that the current “helicopter/snowplow” culture of control is backfiring, royally. It’s an honest if also fairly depressing analysis: the “performancism” epidemic being perpetuated (somewhat out of necessity) by US colleges has filtered down to the preschool level, which, combined with the hangover from the self-esteem movement and incredible advances in technology has created this weird situation where kids grow…

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Exclusion, Inclusion and Identity in The Social Network

Exclusion, Inclusion and Identity in The Social Network

An insightful piece by A.O. Scott over at The NY Times that touches on identity, self-worth and the failure of “works” to assuage the accusing voice of the Law – in this case, the inner critic/persecutor –  as seen through the lens of The Social Network and Wall Street 2. Enough to make one wonder whether the word “drive” is actually a synonym for “socially acceptable yet ultimately counterproductive pursuit of self-justification”:

Every Facebook user, friending and unfriending at will, can travel freely in intersecting circles of his or her own design. In the utopian version of this resulting horizonless…

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Mockingbird at the Movies: I’ve Loved You So Long

Mockingbird at the Movies: I’ve Loved You So Long

Last week while choosing a movie to rent, I stumbled upon one that I have been wanting to watch since its release last year, the French film I’ve Loved You So Long. I had thought it was a romantic comedy, but I was completely blown away by what it actually was – a story of despair and redemption, of our own inner prisons and the freedom of unconditional love, of law and pure gospel, of the grace that breaks into our world as light into darkness. I abreacted twice with tears.

The story is a mystery that unravels subtly and intelligently,…

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