Conferences


The Lame Shall Enter First: Grace and Weakness in Flannery O’Connor

Getting close to the end of our video rollout. This one comes from the incomparable Mr. McD:

The Lame Shall Enter First: Grace and Weakness in Flannery O’Connor – Will McDavid from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

The Risk of Grace Pt 2 – Tullian Tchividjian

Herr Tchividjian’s second talk from Houston, in which he comes clean about the Christian life in no uncertain terms:

The Risk of Grace, part 2 – Tullian Tchividjian from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

Speaking of our man Tullian, just found out that he’ll be with us in NYC in April to lead an on-stage conversation with his good friend Nadia Bolz Weber (on Saturday morning). Should be incredible. And don’t forget: the LIBERATE conference is only a month away!

SPRING CONFERENCE in NYC: Theme and Details

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THE 8th ANNUAL MOCKINGBIRD CONFERENCE

April 16-18, 2015

St George’s Church, New York City

 

“Pardon’s the word to all” – W. Shakespeare

A fresh start. A free pass. An expunged record. To be let off the hook, and not just in theory—that is what it means to be absolved of sin, and it is the life-saving heart of the Christian message. It’s what it is all about.

Yet we seldom experience absolution, in church or any other context. When is the last time you were forgiven for something you had done and it wasn’t surrounded by implicit expectations for the future? What would it look like if we truly believed that God does not hold our past against us? Nor our complicated present, for that matter.

Join us in April as we delve into this most hopeful of subjects. To help, we’ve enlisted Nadia Bolz-Weber (author of Pastrix: The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner & Saint), Jamin Warren (editor of Kill Screen Magazine), and a host of Mockingbirds, including Sarah Condon, Will McDavid, Ethan Richardson, Jacob Smith, and John & David Zahl. Our chaplain will be Jim Munroe, and we’ve got a number of special guests in the works that we hope to announce very soon.

In addition to the main presentations, there will be breakout sessions on a wide range of topics, from theology and religion, to movies and music, children and relationships, to philosophy and psychology. If the past eight years are anything to go by, the conference is sure to be a time of warmth, laughter, delicious food, and maybe even a little freedom. We hope you can join us!

Full schedule will be announced Feb 1st.

The event is open to all, and we guarantee there will be something for everyone. Just be sure to pre-register ASAP, as space is limited.

PRE-REGISTER TODAY!

How I Learned To Love Gravedigging in Marriage – Matt and Megan Magill

And…. we’re back! A handful more videos from the Fall Conference to share, the first of which captures, beautifully, what happens when vulnerability, truth, and amazing harmonies come together:

Cause This is Thriller: How I Learned to Love Grave Digging (in Marriage) – Matt and Megan Magill from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

Earlybird Registration for 2015 Spring Conference in NYC (Expires 1/18)!

Earlybird Registration for 2015 Spring Conference in NYC (Expires 1/18)!

Earlybird pre-registration is now open for our annual Spring Conference, which happens April 16-18th in New York City! Details for the event are still coming together, but we assure you that you’ll not want to miss this one. Speakers already confirmed include author and preacher Nadia Bolz-Weber, journalist Jamin Warren (founder of Killscreen magazine), Mockingbird’s own Jacob Smith, Sarah Condon, and David Zahl, among many others. Our chaplain will be The Rev. Jim Munroe.

As always, in addition to the main presentations, there will be a number of breakout sessions, covering a wide range of topics, from theology to literature, television…

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Living By Grace (and According to Frankenstein) – Matthew Fenlon

Watch out, here comes another session from the Houston Conference:

Living by Grace (and According to Frankenstein) – Matthew Fenlon from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

I Feel Like I Win When I Lose – David Zahl

The closing talk (pre-bagpipes!) from Houston. More videos on their way:

I Feel Like I Win When I Lose – David Zahl from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

For more about The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters, go here.

Grace in Parenting: I Have No Advice – Sarah Condon

This one will have you in stitches (when you’re not tearing up). Enjoy:

Grace in Parenting: I Have No Advice – Sarah Condon from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

The Risk of Grace, Pt 1 – Tullian Tchividjian

Just in time for Thanksgiving, here’s Tullian’s first talk from Houston. The man does not shy away from vulnerability! PtL:

The Risk of Grace, part one – Tullian Tchividjian from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

p.s. She said yes.

The Good News of a High Risk God – Aaron Zimmerman

The first video from our Fall Conference in Houston is ready for blastoff! Enjoy:

The Good News of a High Risk God – Aaron Zimmerman from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

Once again, huge thank you goes out to Mark and David Babikow for making this happen.

2014 Fall Conference Recordings: The Risk of Grace

2014 Fall Conference Recordings: The Risk of Grace

An enormously heartfelt thank-you to everyone who helped put on our Fall Conference in Houston, TX: our friends at St. Thomas Episcopal Church for hosting, The Magills for playing such fantastic music (click here to check out their stuff on iTunes), Mark and David Babikow for being such lifesavers on the audio/visual front, Jim and Tricia Zucker for making the Slaid Cleaves connection, and many more. We are beyond grateful.

We’re once again making the recordings available at no charge; we only ask that those who were not able to attend this year *consider* making a donation to help cover the…

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Drifting Closer in the Dark: An Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Slaid Cleaves

Drifting Closer in the Dark: An Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Slaid Cleaves

We could not be more excited to have Slaid Cleaves join us for the Houston Conference next week. It’s just one of the reasons we hope you’ll meet us there.

There’s plenty of eye-rolling when it comes to American country and folk music, mainly because so much of what used to constitute its storytelling now seems untrue. Songs about rust and horses and top hands and tree yodelers—this used to be far-reaching content; it has since shrunken into American oblivion, re-visited mainly in nichey beer bars by minor players. For anyone other than the Americana devotees, country songs consist, at best, of naïve nostalgia about “simpler times”, and at worst, of abject denial about who we are. And perhaps it is true.