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September Playlist

Ever wonder what it’s like to get pummeled by power? -Pop then -ballads? Cause you’re about to find out:

Mockingbird: Bringing You The (Swedish Yacht-Funk) Gospel, Pt 43

Lay Down Your Weary Tune (in NYC) – David Zahl

The closing talk from our Spring NYC Conference – only loosely related to the talk of the same name given in Tyler:

Lay Down Your Weary Tune – David Zahl from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

Waiting for the Full Revelation of Janelle Monae

Waiting for the Full Revelation of Janelle Monae

I realize that this post is at least two years late, maybe even five. But even though Janelle Monae is no longer ‘new’ to the music scene, nevertheless she does believe, and claims to have participated in, time travel. So this slowpoke post is already forgiven.

Monae is currently making headlines because of her work with the Black Lives Matter movement, which got me re-listening to her music. What I discovered was that even though every major music reviewer covered her “genre-defying” 2013 album, The Electric Lady, few humans have attempted an in-depth interpretation of that which has been heralded as…

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Vacation, All I Never Wanted

Vacation, All I Never Wanted

Louis CK does a bit about marriage (it’s an old bit; he’s since gotten divorced, which makes the content both sad and prescient) in which he recounts his therapist’s recommendation that he take his wife on a date. “I went on a date with my wife, and you know what? I’m not going to call her again.”

My husband reminded me of this joke recently upon returning from our “vacation.”

I use quotes because, as anyone with kids knows (and some have written), any temporary relocation of the family unit would be more aptly described as a trip. I’ve been on vacations…

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August Playlist

An abundance power pop this time around… You’re welcome.

New Country, Same Old Sin

New Country, Same Old Sin

This one comes to us from none other than Asher Noble. FTB:

On July 16th, Australian rock band Tame Impala released their highly anticipated new album, Currents. I don’t claim to be a music critic, but I know when I hear music I like. The band released four singles off the record prior to its formal debut, which formed the soundtrack to spring for my friends and me. It’s hard to describe what was so good about these tracks, but they stuck, and we developed a somewhat cultish fandom for Tame Impala. The resulting excitement for the full-length release was new…

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Joy Williams on One Way Love

The Civil Wars’ Joy Williams released a new album, Venus, a few weeks ago, and it’s worth a listen. In particular, the song “You Loved Me” offers a penetratingly beautiful analysis of both the human condition and grace:

I thought you wouldn’t love me if I didn’t do everything right,
So I lied to tell the truth and hid myself most of all from you;
Good was never perfect, perfect never could be good enough for me.

But I tried, and I failed,
And you loved me.
Oh, I tried, and I failed,
And you loved me.

I had all the answers; that was easier than facing the dark,
And I sold my story until the story started falling apart.
Every secret spoken, out there in the open; I’ve pretended not to see.

And I tried, and I failed;
And you loved me.
And I tried, and I failed;
And you loved me.

Thirteen Songs About Forgiveness Not Written By Don Henley

Thirteen Songs About Forgiveness Not Written By Don Henley

Excited to offer up the following taste of the new issue of The Mockingbird:

“The song that launched a thousand sermons” is one way to describe Don Henley’s 1989 single “The Heart of the Matter”. Mark our words: the composition will outlive anything else the ornery Walden Pond advocate has written, “Hotel California” included—for no other reason than the fact that it still gets routinely name-checked in Sunday sermons across the world, more than 25 years after it was released. Of course, it is a great song. Even those who harbor reservations about The Eagles (e.g., Jeff Lebowski) recognize its power;…

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Penny & Sparrow on Fleeing a Lover

Penny & Sparrow on Fleeing a Lover

There is, in fact, no BuzzFeed quiz for “Which Son in the Parable of the Prodigal Son Are You?”—and if there were, I’m not sure people would take it.

As the story goes, a decently well-off man has two not-that-decent sons. The younger, wild and fugitive, asks his father for an advance on his inheritance. (I have never been a first-century householder or the offspring of one, but have heard this would effectively send the message “You’re dead to me” from son to father.) The father (again, nothing like me, because I would have laughed at this kid or sent him to…

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July Playlist

PZ’s Podcast: Scuppernong and Why Weepest Thou?

PZ’s Podcast: Scuppernong and Why Weepest Thou?

Episode 188: Scuppernong

Tupper Saussy (1936-2007) was a composer and musician that helmed a group in the late 1960s who were called The Neon Philharmonic. Even if you have never heard of The Neon Philharmonic, you’ll recognize their famous hit entitled “Morning Girl”.

Tupper Saussy — it’s a Huguenot name — was also a wanted fugitive for ten years, a devout and thoughtful Christian, a painter, a playwright, and a famous libertarian.

What interests me, though, in addition to his music as The Neon Philharmonic, is his personal fate. Saussy came into the sights — by his “own deliberate fault” (BCP) — of…

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