About Win Jordan

Mockingbird Intern for the Summer of 2013. I'm a rising third-year at the University of Virginia where I am double-majoring in Government and Media Studies.

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    Empathy and True Emotion in The Facebook Mood Experiment

    Empathy and True Emotion in The Facebook Mood Experiment

    A couple weeks ago, it was revealed that back in January 2012, Facebook ran a week long experiment on a small subset of unknowing users that has been dubbed “The Facebook Mood Experiment.” Facebook altered the status updates that these unwitting users saw and skewed them either more negatively (i.e. they saw more updates with sadder emotional content) or more positively (saw updates with happier emotional content). The experiment wanted to see if the content people saw their friends posting on Facebook affected their actual mood. It concluded that it did. The Atlantic breaks down the design of the experiment…

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    Seven Signs Romans 7 Applies to You Perfectly (Look at Number 4!)

    Seven Signs Romans 7 Applies to You Perfectly (Look at Number 4!)

    You know you didn’t want to click this. You saw it and let out a wail of despair that Mockingbird is resorting to “click-bait” headlines, but you saw the adorable puppy as the featured image and clicked anyway. So now here you are.

    “Click-bait” is a tactic used by all different kinds of websites (perfected by Buzzfeed and Upworthy) to inflate page views and Facebook shares. These raw statistics make a site more attractive to advertisers and drive revenue for a site. I’ve definitely succumbed to these. They aren’t inherently bad, but when I waste away a good chunk of my…

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    A Mockingbird World Cup Review (So Far)

    A Mockingbird World Cup Review (So Far)

    I gave myself whiplash celebrating a USA goal. When Jermaine Jones scored in the 64th minute for the US to even the score at 1-1 with Portugal, I raised my fists and snapped my head back so rapidly as I roared that I had quite the headache, and was left massaging my neck. Yes, it was idiotic, but no, I don’t regret it.

    I have fully bought into the fanaticism of the World Cup. I took a little bit too much pride in being able to recite all of the possible outcomes for the US going into the final day of…

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    What is Jim Gaffigan Obsessed with?

    Comedian Jim Gaffigan is back with a brand new stand-up special, Obsessed, and it’s well worth checking out, full of his trademark self-deprecating riffs on food and parenting. For those who are unfamiliar, Gaffigan’s previous material has been remarkably well reviewed on here by Matt Schneider – suffice it to say, the man possesses a keen eye for the subtle ways we justify ourselves in everyday life:

    Changing the Human (and Mutant) Heart in X-Men: Days of Future Past

    Changing the Human (and Mutant) Heart in X-Men: Days of Future Past

    I must confess that after last summer’s Superman debacle I was a little burnt out on superhero movies. They’re made with such frequency now, and many are so formulaic. Yet no matter what they keep making money. Naturally many studio executives are loath to deviate from this formula of prophecies, will-they-or-won’t-they romances, and of course, massive amounts of CGI destruction.

    I’m happy to report that X-Men: Days of Future Past breaks the mold. In fact, it proved to be one of the most creative superhero movies I’ve seen in a very long time. By incorporating time travel, it functions as a…

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    A Mockingbird Guide to the World Cup

    A Mockingbird Guide to the World Cup

    I was nine. It was the summer of 2002 in the early hours of the morning that the US shocked Mexico in the Round of 16 in the World Cup to advance to the quarterfinal. The excitement was electric. Nobody had expected it, but the cries of “U-S-A! U-S-A!” filled the room. It was the best the USA has ever done in a World Cup.

    The World Cup is a sporting event like no other. It ignites more passion than any other, and it starts in less than a week. I realized that this is only the sixth World Cup I’ve…

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    A Quick Calvin and Hobbes

    CHadulthood 2

    Facebook, Politics, and True Forgiveness

    Facebook, Politics, and True Forgiveness

    There has been a new trend amongst my friends on Facebook that is truly terrifying. Somebody will go on another’s profile and scroll all the way back to their middle school days to find the most embarrassing pictures/videos/status updates they can find, they comment or like it, and then it appears on all of your mutual friends’ newsfeeds. So for about the past month, I’ve seen baby-faced versions of my friends with braces all over Facebook. One talked in a video about trying to become an internet sensation, one had an entire album devoted to the shoes he had…

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    The Idiot Forgiveness of Nelson Mandela

    The Idiot Forgiveness of Nelson Mandela

    I spent a semester during my Junior year of high school at a boarding school in the countryside of South Africa. It is a beautiful country with a vibrant cultural heritage. Yesterday, God called one of South Africa’s proudest sons home, Nelson Mandela, and I thought it would be apropos to celebrate the ways in which his life illustrated God’s idiot forgiveness.

    Mandela was a political activist in South Africa under the brutal and repressive Apartheid system. Apartheid was a system of government largely run by the Afrikaners (descendants of the German and Dutch colonists of the area) which functioned by…

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    Mariano Rivera and Success Made Memorable by a Failure

    Mariano Rivera and Success Made Memorable by a Failure

    As a Red Sox fan, the many laws of sports kinship demand I hate Yanks closer Mariano Rivera. But the reality is, while I’ve watched him shutdown countless potential Sox comebacks, I’ve always respected him. Then the other day The Atlantic ran this article on his blown save in Game 7 of the 2001 World Series against the Diamondbacks. This is the moment that shattered his aura of invincibility. When Rivera came into the game with the Yankees leading, the Championship seemed like a lock.

    Whenever Rivera, often referred to as the Hammer of God for the merciless manner in which…

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    Elysium: The Promised Land (Not of Film)

    Elysium: The Promised Land (Not of Film)

    Like many people, I loved Neill Blomkamp’s District 9 for its powerful message mixed with a fresh and intriguing sci-fi story. It was also impressive that it was done on a (relatively speaking) tiny budget of $30 million. So I was excited to see what Blomkamp would do when given a budget four times greater, and bona fide stars like Matt Damon and Jodie Foster. The result was Elysium, and as much as I wish it weren’t the case, it disappoints.

    The titular space station is a paradise for the “haves” who have escaped the disgustingly overpopulated Earth. Its name is…

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    Don’t Worry, Just Dance!: The Songs of Summer ’13

    Don’t Worry, Just Dance!: The Songs of Summer ’13

    Summer is always an amazing time for music, and this year has been no exception, with several notable releases. Usually there’s a single track that is unofficially crowned “the song of the summer.” It’s that one song you can’t escape. You hear it on the radio all the time and you can’t get it out of your head. Last summer it was the bubblegum anthem “Call Me Maybe” by Carly Rae Jepsen. 2011 had the ultra-catchy “Party Rock Anthem” by LMFAO. 2010 was “California Gurls” by Katy Perry, and who could escape 2009’s “I Gotta Feeling” by The Black Eyed…

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    The Beautiful Nonsensicality of The Way, Way Back

    The Beautiful Nonsensicality of The Way, Way Back

    The summer movie season has had its highlights for me (Much Ado About Nothing, The Great Gatsby, and – admittedly – Despicable Me 2). But it’s been the blockbusters that have often been biggest letdowns. Iron Man 3, Man of Steel, and The Wolverine were all pretty underwhelming, each reaping as much destruction on their worlds as possible (and then some). Maybe I’m just tired of all of the buildings collapsing.

    Yesterday, I found the perfect antidote in The Way Way Back, which tells the story of the 14-year-old Duncan (Liam James) who is forced to spend the summer with his…

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    Uncoerced Love in Chaos and Grace

    Uncoerced Love in Chaos and Grace

    An excerpt from Mark Galli’s Chaos and Grace: Discovering the Liberating Work of the Holy Spirit:

    Freedom is not some abstract concept about the ability of the human will. It is nothing less than a way to talk about love. When writing about love, I’m often tempted to add an adjective to it and talk about uncoerced love. True love is always uncoerced, always freely given. But we live in an age in which love is often construed as an obligation or a quid pro quo. We love our spouses because they love us. Or we are required to love the poor….

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    The Freedom of Robert Galbraith

    The Freedom of Robert Galbraith

    As we all know, expectations can be crippling. Success breeds expectations for more success and higher, sometimes unfair, scrutiny can be placed upon a person. This scrutiny can be debilitating, and after an acclaimed bestseller – well, what do you write next?

    Last year, J.K. Rowling published her first book since the finale of Harry Potter, called The Casual Vacancy, under her own name. The book received mixed reviews, but almost all of the negative reviews (e.g. in The New York Times and The LA Times) used Harry Potter as the baseline – the standard – by which to evaluate the…

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