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About Scott Jones

Scott is a pastor (ascensionchurchpa.org), an avid karaoke singer (and former karaoke DJ), and was once a level 62 Hunter Elf in World of Warcraft. He is slugging through a dissertation in his free time. He lives with his best friend Lindy (to whom he's also married). They have two dogs named Lucas and Damien (one of them seems to thinks he's a human). Scott is the host of Mockingbird's podcast, the Mockingcast. He's also the co-host of New Persuasive Words (http://is.gd/G0ee5I), a podcast he does with his friend and co-beligerent Bill Borrer.

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Author Archive
    
    Can These Bones Live?

    Can These Bones Live?

    The greatest American theologian since Jonathan Edwards died this week. His name was Robert Jenson. But to his friends he was “Jens.” Jenson wrote scores of books. His impact on Christian theology will be felt for generations to come. He was a theologian’s theologian with a pastoral heart and a subtle missiological eye. He was one of the great ecumenists of our time, one with deep convictions; we don’t often associate the two. We think of the former as watering down particularity of belief in order to go along to get along. The latter we might admire but don’t invite…

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    Faith of Thrones

    Faith of Thrones

    There are already scores of recaps of Game of Thrones season finale readily available online (see this fine one from NPR for starters). I feel no compulsion to add to the already abundant list. But there was something that stuck out to me that is worth a little reflection. It’s something that has characterized the entirety of the series but of late, for me at least, has become more pronounced. The genre of Game of Thrones is of course fantasy, and like most fantasy stories it’s set in a premodern world. The technology, culture, and religion all seem pre-modern through…

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    The Humanity Of God: An Ascension Day Reflection

    The Humanity Of God: An Ascension Day Reflection

    Commencement season is almost over (there are some college graduations still happening, if you can believe it!). This year I learned of a tradition I didn’t know existed. Apparently a newly elected president’s first commencement address is usually given at Notre Dame. But Donald Trump broke with this convention, recently delivering his first commencement address at Liberty University. In my opinion, it was one of his better public addresses. But he did do one conventional thing in the speech itself: he quoted from Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken.” Quotations from this poem are ubiquitous at graduations, along with inevitable misinterpretations.

    Here is…

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    Avoidance Issues and the Unavoiding God

    Avoidance Issues and the Unavoiding God

    Every year Princeton Seminary brings in a distinguished scholar to deliver the Warfield Lectures. They are one of, if not the most prestigious lecture series in the country. What most people don’t realize is that the lectures are not named for B.B. Warfield, one of the deans of American Calvinism. They were named for his wife, Annie Kinkead Warfield. The story of their marriage is one that has been stuck in the forefront of my mind since I first heard it.

    In 2010 Fred Zaspel wrote a book entitled The Theology of B.B. Warfield: A Systematic Summary. He says that since its…

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    Between Death and Resurrection... He Descended Into Hell

    Between Death and Resurrection… He Descended Into Hell

    Holy Saturday is probably for most Western Christians the most insignificant part of the end of Holy Week. Most churches let it pass without much of a thought. The irony is that this day in between Good Friday and Easter is the day that seems to correspond closest to the everyday experience of the Christian life, which is lived in between the two comings of Christ. To walk by faith and not by sight eagerly awaiting our adoption and “the redemption of our bodies” (Rom 8:23) is to live between death and resurrection.

    I’m told that some Eastern Orthodox Christians spit…

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    The Zacchaeus Option

    The Zacchaeus Option

    I guess there comes a point in every couple’s life where watching TV and not showering is a more alluring prospect than long hygenic rituals followed by being social. My wife and I are binge-watching a new show called Imposters. I thought the show’s premise was implausible, almost silly at first. But now we’re hooked.

    Imposters begins with a newlywed couple so immersed in their own love and happiness, it’s almost nauseating. After some intimate moments (this show is on Bravo) we cut to the husband, Ezra Bloom (played by up-and-coming actor Rob Heaps), talking about his nuptial bliss with co-workers at the…

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    Gaga for Gaga

    Gaga for Gaga

    “The glory of God is man fully alive.” -Irenaeus

    I don’t know the last time I was so fixated on a Super Bowl half time show. Actually I can state with complete confidence that I’ve never been so fixated on one. From beginning to end, Lady Gaga’s performance at Super Bowl LI was one for the record books. It was glorious in the best sense of the word.

    No doubt Gaga’s performance will inspire a sea of words on the interwebs in the next 24 to 48 hours. I hesitate to add the pile of prose. But something caught my eye that…

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    Living With the Enemy Within (at the Holidays)

    A quick quotation from Carl Jung’s Memories, Dreams, Reflections, which you’ll hear me read in the special Holiday Survival Guide episode of The Mockingcast, which just dropped on iTunes:

    1“The acceptance of oneself is the essence of the whole moral problem and the epitome of a whole outlook on life. That I feed the hungry, that I forgive an insult, that I love my enemy in the name of Christ — all these are undoubtedly great virtues. What I do unto the least of my brethren, that I do unto Christ. But what if I should discover that the least among them all, the poorest of all the beggars, the most impudent of all the offenders, the very enemy himself — that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of the alms of my own kindness — that I myself am the enemy who must be loved — what then? As a rule, the Christian’s attitude is then reversed; there is no longer any question of love or long-suffering; we say to the brother within us “Raca,” and condemn and rage against ourselves. We hide it from the world; we refuse to admit ever having met this least among the lowly in ourselves.”

    The Virtue of (Just a Little) Patience

    The Virtue of (Just a Little) Patience

    Another humdinger of a seasonal quotation, this time courtesy of Tomas Halick’s Patience With God, parts of which have appeared on The Mockingcast and Same Old Song:

    Patience with others is Love, Patience with self is Hope, Patience with God is Faith. —Adel Bestavros

    “Hardly anything points toward God and calls as urgently for God as the experience of his absence…

    Yes, patience is what I consider to be the main difference between faith and atheism… What atheism, religious fundamentalism, and the enthusiasm of a too-facile faith have in common is how quickly they can ride roughshod over the…

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    Praying With Trump?

    Praying With Trump?

    Becket is a great film. Maybe the great film. It has the added advantage of being true.

    It’s a film that tells the story of Thomas Becket. He was born sometime in the early 12th century, in all likelihood on the 21st of December on the day of his namesake, Thomas the Apostle (Doubting Thomas).

    Like many of us, he had a messy story. He hung around with elites as a kid but was the son of someone caught between the clear (and perhaps cruel) line between nobility and commoner. History tells us his father was perhaps a knight or modest landowner. But…

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    On Rejecting Love and Little Brothers: From Thomas Merton

    On Rejecting Love and Little Brothers: From Thomas Merton

    The following is an excerpt from Thomas Merton’s The Seven Storey Mountain.

    One thing I would say about my brother John Paul. My most vivid memories of him, in our childhood, all fill me with poignant compunction at the thought of my own pride and hard-heartedness, and his natural humility and love.

    I suppose it is usual for elder brothers, when they are still children, to feel themselves demeaned by the company of a brother four or five years younger, whom they regard as a baby and whom they tend to patronise and look down upon. So when Russ and I and…

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    Life Is Too Politicized When Seth Meyers Stops Being Funny

    Life Is Too Politicized When Seth Meyers Stops Being Funny

    Abraham Kuyper once said that there’s not a microbe in the universe that Christ doesn’t look at and declare “mine”. It feels like American political combative discourse makes the same claim today. Whether it’s chicken sandwiches or late night television, everything is turning shades of red and blue, which will likely lead to us all becoming increasingly black and blue.

    I’m a political person. I’ve donated money to a presidential candidate this year. I watch lots of cable news, I sometimes take perverse delight in the combative rhetoric. I’d like to say political infotainment is a guilty pleasure, but I feel…

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