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About Lauren R.E. Larkin

Lauren R. E. Larkin is a graduate of Trinity School for Ministry where she earned an MDiv and STM focusing on Biblical Studies, Systematic Theology, and Ethics with a special interest in grace, gender, and justice. She is married to a wonderful man and stays at home with her two boys and her daughter. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Universität Zürich. She has contributed essays to various publications, including The Gospel According to Pixar and Comfortable Words: Essays in Honor of Paul F.M. Zahl and regularly contributes to theological blogs: Mockingbird and Key Life. She is one half of EzerUncaged (www.ezeruncaged.com).

http://theneedlethepotandthepen.blogspot.com/

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Author Archive
    
    The Indefatigable Regret of the Sham Existence

    The Indefatigable Regret of the Sham Existence

    “The sinner’s relationlessness and the judgment of God’s wrath upon the sinner which takes place in and with sin is not revealed, however, as sin is enacted but only as it were in retrospect, within the brackets of the revelation of the righteousness of God in the gospel. Only in the one who knew no sin and yet was made sin for us (2 Cor 5.21) is the sinner revealed in relationlessness and sin. That Jesus Christ was made sin for us by God means that the destruere et in nihilum redigere which is enacted in and with our sin is revealed…

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    Rest for the Fickle

    Rest for the Fickle

    We’re fickle. Human beings are fickle. You and I both know it and we’re free to confess it. Our hearts and minds easily change orientation and preferences by the mere shifting of the wind, our hearts and minds have a difficulty staying the course, being constant in our loyalty and affections.

    I do want to be clear that I don’t think all moments of changing our mind are bad; sometimes our propensity toward changing our mind isn’t necessarily a bad thing; there are times receiving new information and incorporating it into our database of knowledge is good, in fact it’s an…

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    The Relief of Grief: A Conference Breakout Preview

    Here’s our latest preview of a conference breakout session! For more relief, honesty and good news, join us during our upcoming conference in NYC, April 14-16.

    interview-with-the-vampire

    If I’m completely honest with you, which I typically am, I’d have to confess that death scares me. Whether it’s walking through the grief of losing loved ones or facing the Grim Reaper’s bony finger pointed in my own direction, death makes me quake in the deepest and most intimate fibers of my being. On my worst days, I’m quite certain that if Lestat de Lioncourt himself knocked on my front door, I’d not only willingly open said door, but cast my very person upon him begging for both bite and bodice.

    I know I’m not alone with these feelings about death–both the fear of and the grief from. While you may not have contemplated embracing vampiric life, there are things you do to run from, ignore, suppress, etc., those feelings of fear and grief brought on by the reality of death. Whether it’s by the pursuit of healthy life and healthy body or by taking on helicopter relationality with all those whom we love and can’t bare to lose, we try, by our own strength, to keep death at bay….at far, far, far bay.

    The good news lies apart from The Vampire Chronicles and outside of ourselves and our meager and feable attemps to protect ourselves and others (and that in and of iself is good news, too). The good news lies in Jesus Christ and that he says, “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted” (Mt. 5:4). And I’d like to be bold and add to that, “Blessed are those who are afraid, for they shall be comforted, too.”

    So, this is what my break out session, “The Relief of Grief,” is all about: the Word of Jesus Christ (who is the Word), the Gospel of the jusification of sinners, that comes to us from with-out us in to the midst of our grief and fear brought on by death to bring us true and real comfort and relief.

    So come and join me; Vampires welcome.

    Pre-register here!

    A Jealous God and a Delusional Mind

    A Jealous God and a Delusional Mind

    Under all my many facades lies a vicious beast. Her name is Jealousy, and she’s no friend. She’s a cruel taskmaster relentlessly whipping my conscience. She’s uncontrollable; in her grip I’m a rag-doll, limp and spineless. Her tongue is swift; she spins the most amazing lies. And while I can’t see her, I feel Jealousy’s presence heavy on my mind and heart, in my muscles and bones.

    God’s jealousy shows how much He loves us (cf. the entire bible); my own jealousy exposes how much I want not to love and, to be honest, how much I want to dominate whoever makes me jealous. When Jealousy rears…

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    Confession as Profession: Love and the Hope of Forgiveness

    Confession as Profession: Love and the Hope of Forgiveness

    “Somewhere else in The Elder Statesman, Lord Claverton observes that no one confesses where there is no hope of forgiveness.” – Capon

    It was one of those mornings. You know, the one with three kids, two of whom are dragging their feet to get ready for the walk to school. My begging and pleading was getting old and so was their concurrent whining. As I watched my seven-year-old struggle to tie his shoe and listened to my eldest whimper about his itchy scarf, the damn broke: “Damn it!”

    I squatted down, grabbed the shoelaces and the foot attached to them and growled, “You’re…

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    I Love You, Child, As I Have Been Loved

    I Love You, Child, As I Have Been Loved

    Perusing some of the links in my favorite online parenting journal, I ran across an interesting little story of a mother and daughter, told from the daughter’s perspective primarily. (Full article here.) The background goes as follows: the mother is apparently in the hospital, hooked up to tubes and unresponsive. The daughter is at her mother’s bedside begging for her to respond. “Please? Mom? C’mon…you have to wake up. This whole thing is freaking me out! You’re just staring.” Throughout the story, the daughter repeats: “Mom, blink if you can hear me.”

    But the daughter’s story is less about getting her mother to…

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    “Excuse Me, Ma’am, But That’s TMI”: Six Favorite Moments of 2015

    “Excuse Me, Ma’am, But That’s TMI”: Six Favorite Moments of 2015

    I’m one of those people who stumbles across shows and albums and movies waaaaaay after they’ve gone public; all the books I read are written by people who have entered into the great slumber decades, if not centuries, ago. I’ve nothing to offer you about books, movies, shows, albums from 2015 that you don’t already know. But, what I can give you as a year-in-review is, well, me. These few moments are merely moments when I was reminded that my faith in Christ and the theology I study are living breathing things: working both in me and through me toward…

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    The Power of Grief and the Gift of the Present

    The Power of Grief and the Gift of the Present

    The proper definition of “grief” is (according to dictionary.com):

    Keen mental suffering or distress over affliction or loss; sharp sorrow; painful regret. 2. a cause or occasion of keen distress or sorrow

    While I wish it were otherwise, grief is something that most of us have felt at one time or another. Grief is one of those classic human experiences symptomatic of brokenness—ours and the world’s around us. Grief overwhelms the entire body; you can feel grief course through your veins, move through your joints, sound from your vocal chords, bear down on your mind, and burden your back.

    The grief I’ve experienced…

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    A Review of Jess Thompson’s Everyday Grace

    A Review of Jess Thompson’s Everyday Grace

    It’s my belief that any book that opens by quoting Janet Jackson is worth reading; Jessica Thompson’s newest book, Everyday Grace, is certainly no exception to that rule. In fact, I’d go so far to say that even without the reference to Janet Jackson the book is worth reading, and not just because Jess is a good friend. As she does in all of her written work, Jess skillfully and clearly communicates the Gospel of Jesus Christ—to the doctrine of the justification of sinners—from every page. From her astute insights into the multifaceted brokenness of all our relationships to her heart-felt,…

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    Absolved Parenthood

    Absolved Parenthood

    I read a post via the online magazine for parents, Brain, Child, titled, “Regret is Poison.” For a Law/Gospel theologian/parent who isn’t afraid of the darkness of human existence, I was a moth to a flame. Regret? I’m listening. Regret as it pertains to guilt and parenting? Hellooo. I’ve been there. Tell me more. So I read the article.

    The author of the article describes her regret and guilt for how she parented her children in vivid, palpable, imagery:

    Now, as my three eldest children round the corner out of adolescence and into adulthood and my youngest is just a few months…

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    Sick to Sick

    Sick to Sick

    An old article from Slate.com recently caught my attention. And by old, I mean OLD by interwebs standards. The article is dated November, 2013. But I’m just reading it now, which is common, as I’m not the most up-to-date person out there.

    The article’s title is eye-catching: No one brings dinner when your daughter is an addict. Essentially, the author writes about how his family’s fridge and freezer overflowed with meals when his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. Visits, cards, well-wishes, and meals upon meals upon meals flooded their home. His wife recovered and the meals waned to a full…

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    Even With the Smallest of Us

    Even With the Smallest of Us

    I have two sons. The older one is your quintessential responsible, law-following, parent-pleasing oldest child—a budding Adam Braverman, if you will. The younger son is, well, the opposite; he’s a total scofflaw. My oldest is ready to leave the house ten minutes before it’s time to go; the younger we have to practically pin to the floor and put his shoes on for him. When I call for the boys, the oldest comes over to me quickly, the younger doesn’t, and claims he didn’t hear… Apparently my voice is of the same frequency and tone as Legos clicking together. My…

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