About Jonathan Adams

Jonathan Adams is the Co-Lead Pastor of The Village Church at Vinings. He and his wife, Jana, currently reside in Atlanta, GA, with their three Children, Noah, Lily and Caleb. Jonathan is also the the Director of Development for Sixty Feet, an NGO in Uganda, rescuing orphan children from the slavery of prison.

http://www.VillageChurchVinings.org

Contact

Author Archive
    Hopelessly Devoted (to Tony): No Longer an Orphan

    Hopelessly Devoted (to Tony): No Longer an Orphan

    Recently, while serving in Kampala, Uganda with one of my favorite ministries, Sixty Feet, I was reminded of a story I once heard from my friend, Jim Gash. The story is called Starfish and goes like this:

    Once upon a time, there was a man who used to go to the ocean to do his writing. He had a habit of walking on the beach before he began his work. One day, as he was walking along the shore, he looked down the beach and saw a human figure moving like a dancer. He smiled to himself at the thought of…

    Read More »

    Prone to Wander…from the Pickle Jar?

    Prone to Wander…from the Pickle Jar?

    A few Sundays ago, I preached a sermon on Galatians 1:11-24, and we had a rough landing. It was one of those Sundays where I felt the plane take off perfectly, maintaining altitude for most of the sermon, but somewhere along the descent we hit turbulence.

    As I drove home that day I asked myself, “What made the last part of my sermon so rough?” Why did I struggle so much with the last five minutes? Well, I realized I was trying to deliver a truth that I wasn’t actually believing myself. During the final point of my sermon–“Who is the…

    Read More »

    The 80s: A ‘Me’ Decade of Law-Gospel-Love

    The 80s: A ‘Me’ Decade of Law-Gospel-Love

    This one comes to us from our good friend Jonathan Adams:

    Minding my own business at the local Starbucks this morning, everyone’s favorite high brow publication, USA Today, grabbed my eye, specifically, an article entitled “We’d Zap Back To The 80’s, If We Could” written in conjunction with National Geographic’s new documentary “The ’80s: The Decade that Made Us” which airs this weekend. The headline alone had me turning on my Walk-man and singing “Take on Me” by A-ha (the best music video MTV ever put out!). I was instantly transported into my parachute pants and Nike Air Jordan’s, break-dancing on…

    Read More »

    From This American Life: When Freedom Means Getting Caught

    From This American Life: When Freedom Means Getting Caught

    This comes from Jonathan Adams, co-pastor at Village Church Vinings in Atlanta, GA.

    A few Saturdays back I was taking my weekend run and listening to my favorite radio show This American Life.   This time it was Episode 477: “Getting Away With It.” Famous host Ira Glass had just finished the Prologue and already my wheels were spinning on how many times I’ve gotten away with it, or at least thought I did.

    Act 1 is enjoyable, but then Ira does something unusual. In Act 2 he opens the phone lines for people to call in and tell their deepest, darkest…

    Read More »

    Hopelessly Devoted: Luke Chapter Fifteen Verses Seventeen through Twenty Four

    Hopelessly Devoted: Luke Chapter Fifteen Verses Seventeen through Twenty Four

    This morning’s devotion comes from Jonathan Adams, pastor of Village Church Vinings in Atlanta, in a piece that was originally titled, “The Gospel is the Final Blow.”

    17 “But when he came to himself, he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have more than enough bread, but I perish here with hunger! 18 I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. 19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.”’ 20 And he arose and came…

    Read More »

    The Guilty Heart of a Ghetto Dependent: Justice for the Sake of Peace

    The Guilty Heart of a Ghetto Dependent: Justice for the Sake of Peace

    This one comes to us from none other than Jonathan Adams:

    “Just before Christmas 2010, a 36-year-old black man, Trevell Coleman, walks into a police station in Harlem and tells the cops that something’s been troubling him. He was involved in a shooting many years ago, sixteen or seventeen years ago, and has information they might want to hear. At first the cops take his name and number, tell him to go home, we’ll look into it, but that was a long time ago. They never call.

    He goes back into the station a few weeks later. It is really eating…

    Read More »