About JDK

Currently, I am three years into a four year doctorate in systematic theology under the supervision Dr. Notger Slenczka at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin. I'm pretty much interested in what everyone else is, namely, the concept of lex semper accusat and the debate over the usus legis operate within the theologies of Robert Jenson, Gerhard Forde and Oswald Bayer ;-) Between my graduation from Washington & Lee University in 2000 and Trinity School for Ministry in 2007, I worked for FOCUS (Fellowship of Christians in Universities and Schools) in Baltimore and Vero Beach, FL. Having served curacies in both Berlin and Austria, he and his wife now live in Louisiville, KY where he is an associate minister at St. Francis in the Fields Episcopal Church. You can hear "All the Gospel that's fit to preach," on my ITunes Podcast: Pelican Pie.

http://jadykoch.com/

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Author Archive
    
    The Reformation Redirection

    The Reformation Redirection

    Happy Reformation Day. If you’ve been following MBird for a while now, then you’ll not be surprised that we get pretty fired up about Reformation Day, but we might celebrate it a bit differently than you might think. For one, our major concern here is not about any particular church vs. another, or even a set of particular doctrines over and against others. Now, to be sure, we have our commitments in these areas, but fundamentally we are concerned about celebrating Reformation Day because of our need–shared across each of our contributors–to hear the pure and unadulterated Good News–the…

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    A New Bo Giertz Must Have Resource: Then Fell the Lord’s Fire

    A New Bo Giertz Must Have Resource: Then Fell the Lord’s Fire

    In his post “The Whole Debt is Paid,” Tullian Tchividjian–our opening speaker at MBird 2013!–recounts a phenomenon that has changed the way he views ministry. He writes:

    I have a long way to go (bad habits die slowly, for sure). But a Copernican revolution of sorts has taken place in my own heart regarding the need to preach the law then the gospel without going back to the law as a means of keeping God’s favor. May God raise up a generation of preachers who storm the gates of worldliness with “It is finished.””

    In this account, he is not only describing an experience that…

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    Top Semiodiscursive Christian Psychology Book Find of 2012: Foundations for Soul Care

    Top Semiodiscursive Christian Psychology Book Find of 2012: Foundations for Soul Care

    I know, right, how could I possibly narrow it all down? Through some happily providential occurrences, I have had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Eric Johnson here in Louisville and of reading his massive tome entitled Foundations for Soul Care: A Christian Psychology Proposal. In this book, Dr. Johnson attempts to bridge the divide between secular and Christian views of psychology in a way that will allow them to speak to each other constructively. Since that is a lot of what we do here in MBird—albeit in a much less technical way—I was excited to run across this book and even…

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    Why Then the Law? Final Thoughts on Final Things

    Why Then the Law? Final Thoughts on Final Things

    “Why then the law?” This has been the question that we have been addressing over the past few weeks and have looked ever so briefly at some of the issues surrounding the question in the history of the church. However, as has been pointed out, the Law is certainly not limited to Christian interpretation, as all religious systems are built as, in effect, ways of addressing what the Apostle Paul says is the “law written on the heart.” Lest we think that this is only a problem for the religious, all we have to do is observe what can only…

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    Why Then the Law? The Persistence of Original Unbelief

    Why Then the Law? The Persistence of Original Unbelief

    One of the great tragedies of the Christian life is captured in Article 9 of the 39 Articles of Religion in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. Article 9 is entitled “Of Original or Birth-Sin,” and argues that “Original Sin,”

    Is not found merely in the following of Adam’s example (as the Pelagians foolishly say). It is rather to be seen in the fault and corruption which is found in the nature of every person who is naturally descended from Adam. The consequence of this is that man is far gone from his original state of righteousness. In his own nature…

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    Why Then The Law? Part 4: Vanity, Mortality, and the Shipwreck of the Soul

    Why Then The Law? Part 4: Vanity, Mortality, and the Shipwreck of the Soul

    We have come to a point in our discussion where we have ruled out a few of the more traditional ways of misunderstanding the role and function of the law in the life of the world. We have seen that the attempt to do away with the law as something that only applied “back then,” (a’la Marcion) rested upon a misunderstanding of its continued pedagogical role in leading people to Christ, i.e., its end. On the other hand, we saw how attempting to rescue the law from the Marcions of the world by boiling it down to a set of…

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    Why Then The Law? Part 3: Letter, Spirit and Life

    Why Then The Law? Part 3: Letter, Spirit and Life

    In our last installment, the argument was made that in an attempt to shore up appreciation and respect for the Old Testament—replete with its necessary connections to the history of Israel–by asserting that its importance was found in the fact that it contained the “moral law,” actually ended up helping to marginalize its truly radical claims. By the 13th Century, when Thomas Aquinas had come and reached full flowering as the towering mental giant of the Middle Ages, the 10 commandments had become the model for “natural reason,” and virtually synonymous with “natural law,” in a way that further solidified their claims…

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    Why Then The Law? Part 2: Go(o)D Almighty

    Why Then The Law? Part 2: Go(o)D Almighty

    To read part one, go here.

    “Did God really say?” According to Genesis 3, this is the question that has haunted human beings from the beginning of time and has contributed to innumerable flights of speculation into God’s very existence. Is there a God, and how do we know? For the writers of the Old Testament, God himself by his self-revelation to Abraham, Issac, Jacob and Moses (to name just a few:) had definitively answered this question. Accordingly, adherence to this revelation—which came in the form of the Mosaic Law—was more a confessional stance than anything else, because like today, the profession…

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    Why Then The Law? Part 1: A Lawful Mess

    Why Then The Law? Part 1: A Lawful Mess

    Throughout the history of the church, the question of the role of the law in the Christian life has been of paramount importance. Indeed, as witnessed to by the writers of the New Testament themselves, the issue was of pressing concern to all involved. In the prologue to John’s Gospel, we hear the radical profession that “the Law came through Moses, but Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ.” What exactly is this distinction between the two about? Why didn’t he simply say, “The Old Law prohibiting shellfish and bacon came through Moses and the New Law of Love came through Jesus?”…

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    We Are Bold to Say… The Lord’s Prayer, Pt 7: For Thine Is the Kingdom, The Power and the Glory, For Ever and Ever. . . Amen.

    We Are Bold to Say… The Lord’s Prayer, Pt 7: For Thine Is the Kingdom, The Power and the Glory, For Ever and Ever. . . Amen.

    We’ve come to the end of our 7 part series on the Lord’s Prayer. Over the past few weeks we have seen how the liturgical invitation to this prayer “we are bold to say,”—one familiar to Christians all over the world—truly is a profound and radical confession of how we understand God and ourselves.

    The relationship between these two—human self-awareness and confession of God—is one that has been recognized as the beating heart of Christian theology in the theologies of both Martin Luther and John Calvin (to name just a few). For the former, it was this relationship that constitutes the…

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    We Are Bold to Say… The Lord’s Prayer, Pt 6: Lead Us Not Into Temptation, But Deliver Us From Evil

    We Are Bold to Say… The Lord’s Prayer, Pt 6: Lead Us Not Into Temptation, But Deliver Us From Evil

    And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. 

    Underlying all theological reflection, and at the center of all religious disputes about “god” lies one fundamental question, namely, does he/she/it to whom and about whom we are speaking actually exist? If so, then, ulitmately, like pesants arguing about the King or citizens arguing about taxes, whatever we are attempting to say is necessarily only for our benefit and not in any way determinative for its actual being. In other words, paraphrasing the late Vaclav Havel, if there is a god, then we are not it.

    As we have seen, this…

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    Forgiveness Has Risen: The Easter Sermon of St. John Chrysostom

    Forgiveness Has Risen: The Easter Sermon of St. John Chrysostom

    If any be pious and a lover of God,
    let him rejoice in this fair and radiant festival.
    If any be a faithful servant
    let him enter into the joy of his Lord.
    If any be weary with fasting,
    let him now enjoy his payment.

    If anyone has labored from the first hour,
    let him receive today his just reward.

    If anyone has come after the third hour,
    let him now be thankful that the feast is at hand,

    If anyone has waited until after the sixth hour, let him not be anxious, no loss shall be his own.

    If anyone has tarried until the ninth hour, let him draw near also, shedding…

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