About David Zahl

David Zahl is the director of Mockingbird Ministries and editor-in-chief of the Mockingbird blog. He and his wife Cate reside in Charlottesville, VA, with their two sons, where David also serves on the staff of Christ Episcopal Church.

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    The Donkey – G.K. Chesterton

    9780394842325When fishes flew and forests walked
    And figs grew upon thorn,
    Some moment when the moon was blood
    Then surely I was born.

    With monstrous head and sickening cry
    And ears like errant wings,
    The devil’s walking parody
    On all four-footed things.

    The tattered outlaw of the earth,
    Of ancient crooked will;
    Starve, scourge, deride me: I am dumb,
    I keep my secret still.

    Fools! For I also had my hour;
    One far fierce hour and sweet:
    There was a shout about my ears,
    And palms before my feet.

    The Danger of Rolling Suffering Into Evil (According to Gerhard Forde)

    A helpful and ever-timely distinction from pages 84-85 of On Being a Theologian of the Cross:

    luther-preaching

    “Contemporary theologians talk much about the problem of evil. Some think it is the most difficult problem for theology today and one of the most persistent causes of unbelief. … Since suffering is itself classified as evil, it is of course simply lumped together with disaster, crime, misfortune of every sort, abuse, holocaust, and all manner of notorious wrong as one and the same problem. So it is almost universally the case that theologians and philosophers include suffering without further qualification among those things they call evil. … Evil does cause suffering — but not always. Indeed, the usual complaint is that the evil don’t seem to suffer. However, the causes of suffering may not always be evil — perhaps not even most of the time. Love can cause suffering. Beauty can be the occasion for suffering. Children with their demands and impetuous cries can cause suffering. Just the toil and trouble of daily life can cause suffering, and so on. Yet these are surely not to be termed evil. The problem of suffering should not just be rolled up with the problem of evil…”

    “Identification of suffering with evil has the further result that God must be absolved from all blame. Thus, the theologian of glory adds to the perfidy of false speech by trying to assure us that God, of course, has nothing to do with suffering and evil. God is “good,” the rewarder of all our “good” works, the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow of merit. …Meanwhile, suffering goes on unabated. If God has nothing to do with suffering, what is he involved with? Whoever does not know God hidden in suffering, Luther asserts in his proof, does not know God at all.”

    And speaking of God hidden in suffering, today’s bonus track would have to be JAZ’s new mix, “For the Heads and the Heart”, which was selected as Dream Chimney’s current mix of the week:

    The (Beginning and) End of Scorekeeping

    Here’s my presentation at last month’s Liberate Conference, which is much indebted to Paul Walker’s talk on the same subject back in 2011. Those who came to the Fall conference in Houston (or have read the new issue of The Mockingbird) may be tempted to subtract points for the overlap:

    LIBERATE 2015 | David Zahl from Coral Ridge | LIBERATE on Vimeo.

    From The Onion: Scientists Discover Eating Serves Function Other Than Easing Anxiety

    Holy lord they got me good today:

    This-Is-40-2-Paul-Rudd-cupcakesPROVIDENCE, RI—Shedding new light on the biological underpinnings behind the behavior, scientists at Brown University announced Tuesday that eating appears to serve a number of key functions besides relieving anxiety. “While a considerable portion of food is indeed ingested in order to distract an individual from feelings of panic and insecurity, our research shows that eating actually confers several benefits beyond temporarily holding despair at bay,” said Dr. Sandra Lutkin, who explained that consuming food has been found to provide vital nutrients to the human body and in many cases replenish it with energy, suggesting that its primary purpose may not be as a coping mechanism at all. “In fact, we observed dozens of subjects and discovered that only a portion of the items they ingested were intended to assuage their apprehension about their job, relationship, or body image…” Although she cautioned the findings were tentative, Lutkin posited that there might be additional methods of eating besides frantically devouring a meal directly over a trash can or sink.

    David Carr Took Good Cards and Set Them on Fire

    David Carr Took Good Cards and Set Them on Fire

    A remarkable passage from the opening to the late David Carr’s unbelievably good memoir of addiction, The Night of the Gun, in which he lays out the difficulty of investigating and recapitulating one’s past. Reminded me of Tavris and Aaronson’s description of memory as editor, i.e. one of the chief instruments of self-justification. Turns out the stories we tell about ourselves, especially the harrowing ones, reveal the narratives we have constructed around our identities–AKA the laws to which we are beholden and which drive our editing/dishonesty, such as Thou Shalt Be Transformed (and Stay That Way). Also one of the…

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    Another Week Ends: Watterson Speaks, Failed Fruit, Liberate Vids, Saturday Morning L/G, Merciless Felines, and Paradise City

    Another Week Ends: Watterson Speaks, Failed Fruit, Liberate Vids, Saturday Morning L/G, Merciless Felines, and Paradise City

    The new issue of The Mockingbird is out the door and holy moly is it awesome. In fact, I dare say it’s the best one yet (#scorekeeping #ethanrichardsonismyhero). But we need your help publicizing! There are some promotional copies available, so if you know of someone/anyone who might help us get the word out or distribute, drop us a line at info@mbird.com, and we’ll pop a copy in the mail post-haste. Otherwise, once you get it, tell the world. We really couldn’t be prouder of this thing. And if you’re wondering what the quote on the inner cover is this time, wonder no…

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    Devastating and Hopeful: Collect for the Second Sunday of Lent

    Devastating and Hopeful: Collect for the Second Sunday of Lent

    Looking through our archives the other day, I was surprised to discover that we’ve never posted an excerpt from The Collects of Thomas Cranmer by Paul Zahl and Fred Barbee. It’s a wonderful little book, really more of a devotional, and not just for those who are interested in Cranmer’s prayers or the Anglican tradition. Take for instance the meditation on the collect for the Second Sunday in Lent (this past Sunday):

    The Collect: Almighty God, which doest see that we have no power of ourselves to help ourselves; keep thou us both outwardly in our bodies, and inwardly in our souls;…

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    Mindful of Our Busyness: Notes on Another Epidemic (and Its Relief)

    Mindful of Our Busyness: Notes on Another Epidemic (and Its Relief)

    A pair of (somewhat) related articles came across my desk yesterday that seem especially relevant with the new ‘Work and Play’ issue of The Mockingbird shipping today. The first is the latest dispatch on that cultural flashpoint known as Busyness. In a pithy blogpost for The Huffington Post, Scott Dannemiller contends that “Busyness Is a Sickness”. Particularly interesting to me was the distinction he makes between ‘busyness’ and ‘stress’, one being elective (in theory) and the other not, ht SM:

    Dr. Susan Koven practices internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. In a 2013 Boston Globe column, she wrote:

    In the past…

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    Lenten Complaint – Scott Cairns

    From his absolutely mandatory collection from last year, Idiot Psalms:

    idiot-psalms-new-poemsThe breakfast was adequate, the fast
    itself sub-par. We gluttons, having
    modified our habits only somewhat
    within the looming Lenten dark, failed
    quite to shake our thick despair, an air
    that clamped the heart, made moot the prayer.
    As dim disciples having seen the light,
    we supplied to it an unrelenting gloom.

    Wipe your chin. I’m dying here
    in Omaha, amid the flat, surrounded
    by the beefy, land-locked generations,
    the river, and the river’s rancid shore.

    O what I wouldn’t give for a lifting,
    cool salt breeze, a beach, a Labrador.

    Another Week Ends: Atheist Fears, Christian Outings, Fame Shame, Self-Dating, Happiness Conspiracies, Noel-isms and Magnificent Ambersons

    Another Week Ends: Atheist Fears, Christian Outings, Fame Shame, Self-Dating, Happiness Conspiracies, Noel-isms and Magnificent Ambersons

    1. British thinker John Gray is at it again, dressing down the New Atheists in a powerful long-read for The Guardian, “What Scares the New Atheists”. There’s a lot in the essay, but one of his primary beefs seems to be the conflation in NA circles of science with politics, specifically their politics, which are curiously uniform. If it sounds familiar, that’s because Gray has gone on record before to debunk the sanguine notion that science is immune to ideological co-option–as evidenced by even the most cursory review of history (eugenics, etc). For him, the main tenets of liberalism simply cannot be divorced from their theistic…

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    A Quick Calvin and Hobbes (for Lent)

    doyoubelieveinthedevil

    The Hope For Some Kind of Sinners Anonymous

    The Hope For Some Kind of Sinners Anonymous

    Better late than never: This past week I came across a remarkable (and remarkably witty) article by Helen Rittelmeyer Andrews, published last January, on the subject of “AA Envy” that seems almost ripped from the pages of Grace in Addiction. Andrews explores why Alcoholics Anonymous gets a free pass in contemporary society when pretty much every other organization/movement that talks openly about “moral failure” and abstention from traditional vices inspires ridicule, contempt or indifference–at least in elite metropolitan circles. Indeed, if NY Times articles like this one are to be trusted, then the inventories and amend-making and low-as-you-can-go anthropology (and monergistic…

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