-1

We’re happy to announce that Issue 4 is now available! Here’s our Table of Contents for the Work and Play Issue. Needless to say there’s lots to be excited for, so if you’re looking for a subscription, now’s the time, because this is also the last time we’ll be selling subscriptions for the price they’re at now ($42).

This is what we’re looking into in this, the Work and Play Issue: We have interviews with best-selling time-researcher (and working mother), Brigid Schulte, as well as the Nigerian theologian of play, Nimi Wariboko. We’re covering a wide variety of topics, from freemium gamers and Fitbit philosophy, to happy jobs and Las Vegas tragedies. There’s an essay on the real meaning of sabbath, and a self-improvement sermon against self-improvement. We also have two new works from the matchless poet Mark Jarman—it’s all too much to name, really. In all of these, though, a common thread remains: one that marks out workweek from weekend, the world of demand from the world of freedom. Along this boundary lie much the world’s troubles, but also its hope, for a little bit of thought, and a lot bit of tomfoolery.

THE WORK AND PLAY ISSUE

Opener

Optimization Nation: Deprogramming the Cult of Productivity by David Zahl

The ConfessionalIssue4Cover

“In a Bookstore,” A Poem by Mark Jarman

Sabbath Time: In a World of Work, an Invitation to Rest by Phillip Cary

For the Record: Games for Non-Gamers by Jamin Warren

The Overwhelm: A Conversation on a Modern Mandate with Brigid Schulte

Happy: America’s Favorite Feeling Goes to Work by Ethan Richardson

For the Record: Nine Comic Books for Your Inner-Child

God So Loved the World of Warcraft: Role-Playing Games and the Labor of Spirituality by Will McDavid

The Logic of Grace Is the Logic of Play: A Q&A with Nimi Wariboko

“Confession,” A Poem by Mark Jarman

Auden, Big Data, and the Accelerated Grimace of Modern America by Evan Brush

For the Record: Eight Must-See ESPN 30 for 30s

De Profundis: Our Past Is Prologue by Michael Nicholson

The End of the Never-Ending Voice, A Sermon by Paul Walker