A great little exchange from his short story, “Teddy”:

“Nicholson looked up at (Teddy), and sustained the look — detaining him.  ‘What would you do if  you could ever change the educational system?’ he asked ambiguously. ‘Ever think about that at all?.’ …

‘Well… I’m not too sure what I’d do,’ Teddy said.  ‘I know I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t start with the things schools usually start with.’  He folded his arms, and reflected briefly.  ‘I think I’d first just assemble all the children together and show them how to meditate.  I’d try to show them how to find out who they are, not just what their names are and things like that… I guess, even before that, I’d get them to empty out everything their parents and everybody ever told them.  I mean even if their parents just told them an elephant’s big, I’d make them empty that out.  An elephant’s only big when it’s next to something else — a dog or a lady, for example.’  Teddy thought another moment.  ‘I wouldn’t even tell them an elephant has a trunk.  I might show them an elephant, if I had one handy, but I’d let them just walk up to the elephant not knowing anything more about it than the elephant knew about them.  The same thing with grass and other things.  I wouldn’t even tell them grass is green.  Colors are only names.  I mean if you tell them the grass is green, it makes them start expecting the grass to look a certain way — your way — instead of some other way that may be just as good, and may be much better… I don’t know.  I’d just make them vomit up every bit of the apple their parents and everybody made them take a bite out of.’

‘There’s no risk you’d be raising a little generation of ignoramuses?’

Why? They wouldn’t any more be ignoramuses than an elephant is.  Or a bird is.  Or a tree is,’ Teddy said. ‘Just because something is a certain way, instead of just behaves a certain way, doesn’t mean it’s an ignoramus.’

‘No?’

‘No!’  Teddy said. ‘Besides, if they wanted to learn all that other stuff — names and colors and things — they could do it, if they felt like it, later on when they were older.  But I’d want them to begin with all the real ways of looking at things, not just the way all the other apple-eaters look at things — that’s what I mean.'”