More news on a story we’ve been following with some interest here at Mockingbird: Anne Rice’s very public rejection of Christianity (while maintaining her personal devotion to and belief in Christ).


The author recently gave a well-worth-a-look interview to Christianity Today. Read it and see what you think. She talks about her thinking on the church, why she left, and her personal spiritual life.

While I found myself at times agreeing, at times disagreeing with her, she made a statement that jolted me:

“Christians have lost credibility in America as people who know how to love.”

Discuss.

PS: A nice bonus in the article is we get to find out what she reads. Her answers may (or may not) surprise you:

Are there any other religious authors you read?
I read theology and biblical scholarship all the time. I love the biblical scholarship of D.A. Carson. I very much love Craig S. Keener. His books on Matthew and John are right here on my desk all the time. I go to Craig Keener for answers because his commentary on Scripture is so thorough. I still read N.T. Wright. I love the Catholic theologian Karl Rahner. I love his writing on Jesus Christ. It’s very beautiful to me, and I study a little bit of it every day. Of course, I love Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.
You mentioned D.A. Carson, Craig Keener, and N.T. Wright. They are fairly conservative Protestants.
Sometimes the most conservative people are the most biblically and scholastically sound. They have studied Scripture and have studied skeptical scholarship. They make brilliant arguments for the way something in the Bible reads and how it’s been interpreted. I don’t go to them necessarily to know more about their personal beliefs. It’s the brilliance they bring to bear on the text that appeals to me. Of all the people I’ve read over the years, it’s their work that I keep on my desk. They’re all non-Catholics, but they’re believers, they document their books well, they write well, they’re scrupulously honest as scholars, and they don’t have a bias. Many of the skeptical non-believer biblical scholars have a terrible bias. To them, Jesus didn’t rise from the dead, so there’s no point in discussing it. I want someone to approach the text and tell me what it says, how the language worked.