The NY Times recently published an absolute knockout of an editorial by David Brooks, entitled “Bill Wilson’s Gospel”  wherein some of the counter-intuitive virtues of Alcoholics Anonymous are extolled. A few choice paragraphs include (ht MZ):

In a culture that generally celebrates empowerment and self-esteem, A.A. begins with disempowerment. The goal is to get people to gain control over their lives, but it all begins with an act of surrender and an admission of weakness.

In a culture that thinks of itself as individualistic, A.A. relies on fellowship. The general idea is that people aren’t really captains of their own ship. Successful members become deeply intertwined with one another — learning, sharing, suffering and mentoring one another. Individual repair is a social effort.

In a world in which gurus try to carefully design and impose their ideas, Wilson surrendered control. He wrote down the famous steps and foundations, but A.A. allows each local group to form, adapt and innovate. There is less quality control. Some groups and leaders are great; some are terrible. But it also means that A.A. is decentralized, innovative and dynamic.

For more on this subject, we highly recommend our recent publication Grace In Addiction: What The Church Can Learn From Alcoholics Anonymous.