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Announcing More Theology & Less Heavy Cream by Robert Farrar Capon!

Announcing More Theology & Less Heavy Cream by Robert Farrar Capon!

This is such an honor. A dream come true even–if we’d been bold enough to dream that big. Today we can finally announce the release of More Theology & Less Heavy Cream: The Domestic Life of Pietro and Madeleine, a brand new title from the late Robert Farrar Capon. Father...

Searching Low and High for the Who Behind The Who

Searching Low and High for the Who Behind The Who

A flurry of thinkpieces circulating at the moment about the dark side of identity politics—for reasons that should be fairly self-evident. Just before starting in on a contribution of my own, a guardian angel reminded me that I’d already spilled plenty of ink on that subject in The Who chapter...

Announcing Churchy: The Real Life Adventures of a Wife, Mom, & Priest by Sarah Condon!

Announcing Churchy: The Real Life Adventures of a Wife, Mom, & Priest by Sarah Condon!

Well, it’s that time of year again! The ubiquity of Mariah Carey heralds the thrill of hope and the pressure of gift-giving–and the release of new Mockingbird publications. We could not possibly be more excited to present you with the first of the two:

“One woman’s hilarious and deeply touching dispatch from the trenches...
Bumper Stickers and Background Screens: Reflections on Losing a Child

Bumper Stickers and Background Screens: Reflections on Losing a Child

Our bumper stickers and computer backgrounds reveal so much about us. Through the college team logo, the institution we attended, a political cause, or images of loved ones, we tell the world so much about what we love, desire, and stand for.

I have often considered what the picture displayed on...

Reckoning With the Advent Police

Reckoning With the Advent Police

I have long held off on writing an anathema against the Advent Police. Mostly because I know and love so many of them. I’ve kept silent about these well-meaning liturgical lawyers because I love the season of Christmas just as much as the next seminary nerd devout Christian. I love...

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Another Week Ends: Silent Scorsese, Chinese Credit, Stigma Supremacy, Moralized Rationality, Merciful Madness, and Anderson Xmas

Another Week Ends: Silent Scorsese, Chinese Credit, Stigma Supremacy, Moralized Rationality, Merciful Madness, and Anderson Xmas

1. If there’s a must-read article this week, it’s the profile of director Martin Scorsese that Paul Elie produced for The NY Times Magazine. Elie is always a joy to read and “The Passion of Martin Scorsese” is no exception. Most of it centers around Scorsese’s adaptation of Shusaku Endo’s Silence, a ridiculously Christocentric project that he’s been working on for 27 years. The article is not short, but you’ll kick yourself if you skim over the anecdotes Martin relays from childhood. Basically, he had the polar opposite experience of the Roman Catholic Church than you normally hear about in…

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On Failing French and Prayer

On Failing French and Prayer

 This one comes to us from our friend, Cort Gatliff.

When my wife, Abby, and I were dating, she told me not to bother trying to marry her unless I was willing to move to France, where she could perfect her near-fluent command of the French language. Assuming this ultimatum fell into the category of “things idealistic twentysomethings say after two glasses of wine,” I agreed. But just a year into our marriage, she called my bluff. We’re now living in an attic apartment above a pharmacy in a small, grey town in northern France.

Abby, who is teaching English at a…

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December Playlist: Happy Birthday Baby Jesus 2016

Don’t rat me out to the Advent police — here’s this year’s Xmas mix.

Announcing More Theology & Less Heavy Cream by Robert Farrar Capon!

This is such an honor. A dream come true even–if we’d been bold enough to dream that big. Today we can finally announce the release of More Theology & Less Heavy Cream: The Domestic Life of Pietro and Madeleine, a brand new title from the late Robert Farrar Capon. Father Capon has been one of Mockingbird’s guiding lights since our founding in 2007, and we had the distinct privilege of conducting his final interview before he passed away in 2013. Suffice it to say, More Theology and Less Heavy Cream is an indispensable look into Capon’s own kitchen (and soul).

screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-8-18-38-am-1

The blurb reads as follows:

“A dash of theology. A pinch of satire. The unmistakable smell of roasted lamb. Father Capon is back. More Theology & Less Heavy Cream collects 27 essays from the much-missed theologian, writer, and chef, featuring him and his wife’s lovable alter-egos, Pietro and Madeleine. Armed only with oven mitts and a razor-sharp wit, this unforgettable couple spars over God, food, grace, and everything in between.”

Pre-order your copy today! Available at other outlets this coming Monday, December 5.

P.S. This is the first of five out-of-circulation Capon books that we’ll be publishing over the next 18 months!

P.P.S. Order both of our new publications together and save some cash. We call it the “Capon Condon Combo”.

Announcing Churchy: The Real Life Adventures of a Wife, Mom, & Priest by Sarah Condon!

Well, it’s that time of year again! The ubiquity of Mariah Carey heralds the thrill of hope and the pressure of gift-giving–and the release of new Mockingbird publications. We could not possibly be more excited to present you with the first of the two:

churchy

“One woman’s hilarious and deeply touching dispatch from the trenches of contemporary life, Churchy traces the fingerprints of grace from hospital hallways to community swimming pools to church nurseries and back again. Unflinchingly honest yet unfailingly hopeful, Rev. Sarah is a genre unto herself. You’ve never had this much fun going to church.”

Pre-order your copy today and it will ship on Monday!

The Triumph of Hope Over Self-Knowledge

A quick paragraph from Alain de Botton’s marvelous first book, On Love (1993):

41m6kn3sf-l-_sx326_bo1204203200_What is so frightening is the extent to which we may idealize others when we have such trouble tolerating ourselves–because we have such trouble… I must have realized that Chloe was only human, with all the implications carried by the word, but could I not be forgiven for my desire to suspend such a thought? Every fall into love involves the triumph of hope over self-knowledge. We fall in love hoping we won’t find in another what we know is in ourselves, all the cowardice, weakness, laziness, dishonesty, compromise, and stupidity. We throw a cordon of love around the chosen one and decide that everything within it will somehow be free of our faults. We locate inside another a perfection that eludes us within ourselves, and through our union with the beloved hope to maintain (against the evidence of all self-knowledge) a precarious faith in our species.

The Indefatigable Regret of the Sham Existence

The Indefatigable Regret of the Sham Existence

“The sinner’s relationlessness and the judgment of God’s wrath upon the sinner which takes place in and with sin is not revealed, however, as sin is enacted but only as it were in retrospect, within the brackets of the revelation of the righteousness of God in the gospel. Only in the one who knew no sin and yet was made sin for us (2 Cor 5.21) is the sinner revealed in relationlessness and sin. That Jesus Christ was made sin for us by God means that the destruere et in nihilum redigere which is enacted in and with our sin is revealed…

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Moana Leads the Way Home (and to the Horizon)

Moana Leads the Way Home (and to the Horizon)

One of the more attractive elements of grace-based living is that it removes (in doctrine, anyway, if not always in practice) the pressure to discern every decision correctly. Both the roughing-it-through-the-grind and seeking-the-horizon are both valid and acceptable approaches to life. This stance contrasts with FOMO-driven media in both the general and Christian spheres. Such movies, books, sermons, etc emphasize the importance of striving over settling. Persistence involves driving forward toward goals, not simply making it through.

Mbird contributors (and, I think, readers) have diverse views on theology and practice, but we are mostly united in our skepticism of the ever-striving-forward…

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Falling Into Grace, Part Two – John Newton

Such a privilege to offer up the second half of John Newton’s wonderful presentation in Oklahoma City on his (wonderful) book Falling Into Grace. Click here to watch part one.

Falling Into Grace, Part Two – John Newton from Mockingbird on Vimeo.

On Being Outsiders…and Not Quite Bulletproof

On Being Outsiders…and Not Quite Bulletproof

Just wanted to let you know you can all calm down: I figured out the Election of 2016.

Okay, maybe I didn’t “figure it out” so much as “choose the theory I find least disquieting among all the ones being thrown around right now.” The narrative of this election, after all, is being told and retold all over social and traditional media. There seems to be no escaping the countless voices clamoring to be heard, the opinions on why the winner won and the loser lost. One of the refrains that caught my eye early, though, and still sticks, is that so many…

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Silence of the Turkeys?

Silence of the Turkeys?

Here’s another one from Joshua Retterer:

Thanksgiving was good this year. The food was tasty. There was no drama, at least that I was aware of. We’re a family predominantly of introverts. For this I am thankful.

I decided to take full advantage of the long weekend off and keep as quiet and inactive as possible. No Black Friday shopping for me. For this I am thankful.

Browsing Youtube, I caught the jaw-dropping trailer for Martin Scorsese’s much-anticipated adaptation of Shusaku Endo’s novel Silence. I immediately felt a stab of guilt. His book is gathering dust on my bookshelf unread. I know I should read it,…

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How Hans Urs von Balthasar Stopped Up His Ears

An incisive passage from Hans Urs Von Balthasar’s Heart of the World, ht Clayton Hornback:

heart-of-the-worldI’ve been a person who has fulfilled his religious obligations. I am a practicing Christian. I am a good Catholic. Sundays I’ve always been in church. I’ve made my Easter duty. I’ve paid my tithes. I’ve given my alms. I’ve always said my morning and evening prayers. I have always been to confession and they’ve always been valid. I have made my nine First Fridays (which, after all, have given me a kind of insurance before God, sanctioned by the Church). I’ve gone to Communion every Sunday. I’ve communicated daily.

‘I have, I have’. What I’ve done with my religion is raised up walls against God. By my practices I have stopped up my ears to God’s call. Quietly, imperceptibly, everything which could have been life has become a mechanism behind which my soul has laid itself to rest.